15 January 1559 – The coronation of Elizabeth I, Gloriana

Posted By on January 15, 2016

Elizabeth I Coronation Miniature On this day in history, 15th January 1559, Elizabeth Tudor, daughter of Henry VIII and his second wife Anne Boleyn, was crowned queen by Owen Oglethorpe, Bishop of Carlisle, at Westminster Abbey.

Elizabeth was just twenty-five years old and would be the longest reigning Tudor monarch, ruling England for over forty-four years. She has gone down in history as “The Virgin Queen”, “Gloriana” and “Good Queen Bess”, although historians now question whether her reign really was the “golden age” it was once known as.

Here are links to articles about Elizabeth I’s coronation:

5 thoughts on “15 January 1559 – The coronation of Elizabeth I, Gloriana”

  1. bruno says:

    Wow, lovely picture of a beautiful dignified young woman.
    Pictures (especially pretty ones) are not facts, I know.
    But I find it quite touching when seeing what she came through, being only 25 then .
    As a queen however, I think she did far better than her father.
    And her reputation spread in any royal head afterwards.
    An anecdote I read in countess of Boigne’s memoirs (of course they were written in french 😉 ) reporting about Charlotte, princess of Wales, only heir of the british throne – by then, ie long before all the mad king George’s bachelor sons had to marry in order to produce some legitimate progeny, among it QV and the future king of Hanover – shows how strong her influence and very lasting.
    The countess indicates that the young princess prepared herself to these high functions any time of her life from what she learnt and heard about Elizabet Ist and even imitated the “Virgin Queen”‘s gesture and behaviour – very brisky in conversation, although secretly very tender to her close friends, among them future countess Flahault and latter of course her own husband .

  2. Alice Rey says:

    Haha isn’t fate artistic? I think it’s pretty widely accepted that had Anne Boleyn borne a living son, she would not have been executed. Henry, who thought himself so superior and masculine, was completely put to shame by his youngest daughter, who he labelled a bastard. I would absolutely adore to (somehow!!) tell him about Elizabeth’s defeat of the Spanish Armada. He’d probably try to execute me oh well

  3. Alice Rey says:

    Haha isn’t fate artistic? I think it’s pretty widely accepted that had Anne Boleyn borne a living son, she would not have been executed. Henry, who thought himself so superior and masculine, was completely put to shame by his youngest daughter, who he labelled a bastard. I would absolutely adore to (somehow!!) tell him about Elizabeth’s defeat of the Spanish Armada. He’d probably try to execute me oh well

  4. bruno says:

    Hello Alice Rey, I agree with you : King Henry was more successfull in concentrating power in his own hands (money from the past church, unity from his subjects, fearing to be treated as traitors) than showing great military capacities.
    For instance, being abroad in sept 1513 while Britain won on the famous Flodden Field (willing to fight against France, and not aware he was manipulated by the pope and by his father-in-law King Ferdinand as well), he had left his wife as regent, chief of the british forces.
    This Lady was proud enough to send him a letter.
    Pointing that british people were blessed by such a victory IN HIS ABSENCE and that, even if he happened to win “all the crown(s) of France”, he could not expect better success in her opinion.
    And as we know, his campaign in France was no success at all.
    I can guess that, afterwards, his queen had much subject to regret her psychological mistake – and maybe was reproached the scottish king’s death (time to remeber that this one was his brother-in-law)

  5. Banditqueen says:

    The picture is of a glorious young woman in gold with golden red hair and fire in her eyes, dressed in the colour of the sun, in the gold of the gods. What wonderful impressions coronation robes and ceremonies made. Then reality set in.

Please note: Comment moderation is currently enabled so there will be a delay between when you post your comment and when it shows up.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.