18 April 1536 – To bow, or not to bow…

Posted By on April 18, 2018

On this day in history, King Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell and the Boleyns scored a bit of a victory over Eustace Chapuys, the man who represented Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, at the English court. They manoeuvred the ambassador into a position where he was forced to pay reverence to Queen Anne Boleyn, thereby acknowledging her as queen, something which he had not done before.

Chapuys had just turned down an invitation from the king to “go and visit and kiss the Concubine”, the Concubine being Anne, so Lord Rochford, the queen’s brother, conducted the ambassador to mass and managed to position the ambassador behind the door by which Anne would enter. As she came through the door, Anne, knowing full well that the ambassador had been placed there, turned to him and bowed, forcing Chapuys to do the same to her. Clever!

You can read more about what happened in my article from 2016 – click here to read it now.

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Sexuality and its Impact on History – Guest Post by Judith Arnopp

Posted By on April 16, 2018

Thank you to author Judith Arnopp for joining us today on the Anne Boleyn Files with this wonderful guest post. Judith is one of the authors of the new collaborative book Sexuality and its Impact on History which is published by Pen & Sword. Over to Judith…

I’ve been interested in history all my life, cutting my teeth on the Tudors while still at school in the ’70s. Like many girls I was drawn to Anne Boleyn’s story. In those days information wasn’t as readily available as it is now but I read all the novels I could lay hands on, visited the library and took home huge piles of books on Tudor history. It wasn’t until many years later when I began to write professionally that I undertook any really in-depth study. The Kiss of the Concubine was my fifth novel, my second set in the Tudor era, and during the research period I was intrigued at the hints of a relationship between Anne and Thomas Wyatt.

Wyatt’s poetry, as well as being beautifully fine examples of 16th century verse does indeed hint of a possible relationship. Of course, even had they been deeply in love it would have been hopeless for Wyatt was already married, but then as well as now, that does not necessarily preclude an affair. In my novel I play with the idea of an unrequited love, an attraction deeper on Thomas Wyatt’s side than on Anne’s.

(more…)

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