60 second history – Lady Jane Grey, Queen Jane

Posted By on March 24, 2017

Lady Jane Grey, or Queen Jane, regularly gets missed off lists of monarchs of England, but I haven’t missed her out in my 60-second history video series!

As I’ve explained before, the idea of this series is to give information about Tudor history in easy-to-digest 60-second chunks. Die-hard Tudor history fans don’t, of course, need these videos, but I hope they act as introductions to newbies or students.

My first four videos were on the Tudor dynasty, Henry VII, Henry VIII and Edward VI. You can catch them on the 60 Second History playlist of the Anne Boleyn Files YouTube channel.

Here’s the latest one!

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Katherine Howard (1524-1542): A Queen’s Jewels

Posted By on March 24, 2017

Thank you to my dear friend Teri Fitzgerald for writing this guest article on Katherine Howard and her portraiture. Here is an excerpt and you can read the rest if you open or download it as a report using the links at the bottom. Over to Teri…

In his meticulously researched and thoughtful biography of Katherine Howard, Young & Damned & Fair (2017), Gareth Russell brings to life Henry VIII’s young queen: she is attractive, likeable and at the same time startlingly reckless.

In July 1540 when Katherine Howard, niece of the Duke of Norfolk, gave her hand in marriage to Henry VIII, she was already pledged to another man. It would come as a devastating blow to the king, by now well past his prime, to discover that his lovely young bride was not the jewel of womanhood he believed her to be and that his marriage was invalid.

In late 1541 an investigation established that the Queen had been involved with three men both before and after the royal marriage: first with her music master, Henry Mannock followed by Francis Dereham in the household of the dowager Duchess of Norfolk, then Thomas Culpeper, a gentleman of the privy chamber, replaced Francis Dereham in the Queen’s affections.1

[Dereham] “kept the lady from the time he violated her at the age of 13 until 18.”

From his despatch to Francis I in December 1541, it appears that although the French ambassador, Charles de Marillac, had been informed of the queen’s age, the time frame of her alleged misconduct, as well as the involvement of Dereham and Culpeper, he was apparently oblivious to the ‘furtive fondling’ of Henry Mannock when Katherine was, in her own words, ‘but a young girl’.2

Click here to carry on reading and to download Teri’s report as a PDF.

Click here to see the List of Figures which gives more detail on the portraits and images.

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24 March 1603 – Queen Elizabeth I dies at Richmond

24 March 1603 – Queen Elizabeth I dies at Richmond

On this day in history, 24th March 1603, the sixty-nine-year-old Queen Elizabeth I died at Richmond Palace. She had ruled for over 44 years. Here is an excerpt from my book Illustrated Kings and Queens of England on Elizabeth I: Elizabeth I was born on 7 September 1533 at Greenwich Palace. She was the daughter […]

23 March 1534 – The Pope versus Henry VIII

23 March 1534 – The Pope versus Henry VIII

On this day in history, 23rd March 1534, Pope Clement VII declared that the marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon “always hath stood, and still doth stand, firm and canonical […] and that the aforesaid Henry king of England is and shall be bound and obstrict to the matrimonial society and cohabitation with […]

Katherine Willoughby, Duchess of Suffolk – I love her!

Today is the traditional date given for the birth of Katherine Willoughby (married names Brandon and Bertie), Duchess of Suffolk, and a woman who is known for her patronage of the reformed religion and reformists. She is a woman who appeals to me because of her reformed faith (the Reformation is my second favourite Tudor […]

World Poetry Day 2017

World Poetry Day 2017

A Facebook post by the BBC has just alerted me to the fact that it is World Poetry Day today. How can I be a literature lover and not know that? Oh dear! I love so many poems, but because I have a rather soft spot for Thomas Wyatt the Elder I will share one […]

21 March 1556 – Thomas Cranmer’s martyrdom

21 March 1556 – Thomas Cranmer’s martyrdom

On this day in history, 21st March 1556, Thomas Cranmer, former Archbishop of Canterbury, was burned at the stake in Oxford after being found guilty of heresy in the reign of Mary I. He is one of three Protestant bishops who were executed in Mary I’s reign and who have become known as the Oxford […]

60 second history – Edward VI

60 second history – Edward VI

I had fun today trying to record my latest 60-second history video. Who knew that it could take 10 ‘takes’ to film something that lasts 60 seconds? Well, it doesn’t normally, but today I had cats jumping in front of the camera, dogs scratching or barking, doors banging… I thought I’d never get it done! […]