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The royals and Maundy Thursday

Posted By on April 18, 2019

Today, the day before Good Friday, is Maundy Thursday or Holy Thursday. It’s the day that commemorates the Last Supper, that final and special meal that Jesus Christ had with his disciples, and where he washed their feet.

As I’ve explained in previous articles, the Gospels’ account of Jesus washing his disciples’ feet was remembered and re-enacted by thepPope, from at least the eleventh century. The pope would wash the feet of twelve of his subdeacons on Maundy Thursday. The present pope, Pope Francis, also re-enacts this event. In 2016, he washed the feet of asylum seekers; in 2017, he washed the feet of refugees; in 2018, he washed the feet of inmates at Rome’s Regina Coeli Prison, and this year he is due to wash inmates’ feet at the prison at Velletri.

In England, from the reign of King Edward II, monarchs also re-enacted this foot washing, choosing to wash the feet of poor people. On Maundy Thursday each year, the monarch and his consort would wash the feet of as many poor people as years they were old and purses of Maundy money (alms) would also be given to these people. The monarch no longer washes people’s feet, but our present queen, Queen Elizabeth II, still attends the special Maundy Thursday service and hands out Maundy Money to pensioners from the community. Today, she was joined by Princess Eugenie at the service at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, where commemorative purses were given to 93 men and 93 women. See Maundy Thursday: Queen joined by Eugenie at Windsor service for a news report and photos.

You can read more about Queen Anne Boleyn and Maundy Thursday by clicking here.

The 18th April was also the day when Eustace Chapuys, the imperial ambassador, ended up paying reverence to Queen Anne Boleyn. Click here for more.

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Was Anne Boleyn involved with any other men? – Part 2

Posted By on April 18, 2019

In today’s instalment of my video series “Questions about Anne Boleyn”, I consider the other men (apart from the obvious man, Henry VIII) that Anne Boleyn was involved with or linked to.

In Part 1, I looked at James Butler and Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland, and in Part 2, I consider poet and diplomat Sir Thomas Wyatt the Elder and the men with whom Anne was accused of committing adultery and plotting to kill her husband, King Henry VIII, in particular, Mark Smeaton and Sir Henry Norris.

I do hope you’re enjoying this video series. Don’t forget that I’m also recording “on this day in Tudor history” videos on a daily basis, and, due to popular demand (thank you!), I’m going to be doing a video countdown of the main events leading to Anne Boleyn’s execution on 19th May 1536! Am I mad? Yes, entirely!

Part 1 can be found at https://youtu.be/2Ai-RYY3hig

Here are the links to the articles I mentioned:

By the way, if you’re interested in my book The Fall of Anne Boleyn, you can get it here.

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