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Researching “In The Footsteps of Anne Boleyn” – Guest Post by Natalie Grueninger and Sarah Morris

Posted By on December 2, 2013

Natalie at Blickling Hall

Natalie at Blickling Hall

Today’s guest post is by Natalie Grueninger and Sarah Morris, authors of “In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn”, and is part of their book tour. Welcome Natalie and Sarah!

Amberley Publishing have kindly offered Anne Boleyn Files visitors 2 copies of the book. To be in with a chance of winning one of them, all you need to do is be an Anne Boleyn Files subscriber (sign up in the left hand menu bar)and leave a comment below this post saying what your favourite Tudor place is. Comment before midnight Wednesday 4th December (Eastern time) and I’ll pick two winners at random on Thursday.

Over to Sarah and Natalie…

Right from the start, we were clear that In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn would be a visitor’s companion or guide, allowing readers to get up close and personal with Anne Boleyn, one of England’s most enthralling queen consorts. What was also clear was that this book was not going to be researched solely from the comfort of our home offices. In order to breathe life into the odyssey that would see a slight, English girl transformed into a captivating woman, forged in the heartland of Europe’s renaissance, we needed to pack our bags and literally follow in her footsteps ourselves. We were to head off on our own adventure of a lifetime! Except, whilst Anne’s progress through the Low Countries and France, followed later by sojourns to all of Henry’s Great Houses in the Thames Valley and a multitude of lesser ones, was spread over twenty-three years, we set ourselves less than a year to complete our task. It was going to be an intense ride, filled with thrilling highs and exhausting lows.

But before we could pull our suitcases and picnic hampers out of the cupboards, there was some vital ground work to be covered. The first stage was a brainstorm of all the places that we could think of from our previous knowledge and research of Anne’s life. Within a half an hour, we had a list of around fifty locations. After some debate, we decided to build up the book chronologically, following Anne from cradle to grave as best as we were able. We wanted to see more easily how the places she visited, and the people she encountered, forged her legendary intelligence, grace, determination and courage. This would prove to be particular apposite for the entries covering Anne’s formative years overseas. After slotting these locations into one of four broad categories, The Early Years; The Courting Years; Anne the Queen and the 1535 Progress, we then divided up the number of entries equally between us so that we could work on each one in detail, allocating locations according to any research that had been completed for previous writing projects, or according to particular pre-existing interests and familiarity.

The next stage was researching as much as we were able about each location in turn. As the bibliography in the book shows, we drew on an extensive range of primary and secondary sources in order to piece together a ‘story’ about each place: its history; what it looked like, and how is was arranged in the early sixteenth century; the dates of the visit(s) and any relevant events that took place there. With regard to appearance, we then undertook internet-based searches for any contemporary images that remained extant. If these did not exist, then the oldest surviving image was the next best substitute. Such searches could go on over days or weeks, and not uncommonly when we were just about to give up hope having drawn a blank, we would uncover a gem – perhaps a picture held in a private collection or archive, or even a modern day artist’s impression of a lost palace or manor house.

Sarah at the Château de Chaumont

Sarah at the Château de Chaumont

In the process, we purchased many tens of books, finding that old antiquarian books frequently contained rarely seen, non-copyrighted images. These images were not only refreshing and often very beautiful, but helpfully, they quite often meant we could evade the very hefty charges made by the likes of the National Trust and English Heritage for images under their ownership. Sometimes, we would only find the perfect image after visiting a location, when a treasure, such as the eighteenth century picture of Hever for example, the earliest one that we encountered, would be pointed out to us. These wonderfully informative images, which included floor plans, such as we found hanging on the wall at Hertford Castle, and reconstructions, such as for Rochford Hall, were often located in shadowy corridors, given scant attention by passersby but providing a wealth of information that assisted us in building up our understanding of a location.

It was such fun to learn to read a picture, as we both became increasingly familiar with the usual layout of a medieval / Tudor palace or manor house, and where the principal public and privy chambers used by the king and queen would be located – how they were once arranged. We became used to the notion of how a subject would cede his own privy apartments to his sovereign lord and lady, allowing us to pinpoint the likely chambers used by Anne and Henry during their progresses through the realm, such as at Gloucester Abbey, Thornbury Castle, or at palaces like Bishop’s Waltham and Wolvesley, in Winchester.

Of course, local historical societies and enthusiastic amateurs, who often act as guardians of local history, were vital in our endeavours. Such individuals had a veritable wealth of detailed knowledge of the places under their care – such was the case, for example, with the Friends of Woking Palace. This was also the case at a number of towns and villages, such as we found at Waltham Abbey, Sandwich and Ewelme. In other cases, the owners of the building itself would produce a treasure trove of information, as was the case at Leonard Stanley and Brockworth Court. As a consequence, on several occasions, we found ourselves having coffee over a kitchen table or in someone’s front room, surrounded by engravings, plans and a cornucopia of written information. And so, whilst, books, contemporary accounts, letters and household accounts of the royal court provided crucial information about Anne’s movements alongside her husband and the places they visited, of course, nothing could replace the need to actually visit the location itself.

Amboise

Amboise

We confess this was indeed the most fun part of the research! Although we started out with around fifty locations, over the weeks and months, the research itself unearthed over twenty more. This was both exciting and frustrating; exciting, as we were putting another piece of the jigsaw in its rightful place. Many of these locations we knew very little about, and so it was truly a journey of discovery and thrilling to re-present a ‘lost’, or little considered location to the Anne Boleyn community, such as Church House on Crane Street in Salisbury, the Old Palace of Langley that once lay deep in the heart of the ancient forest of Wychwood in Oxfordshire, or the Château de Chaumont in France; frustrating, as oftentimes a location would come to light after having already visited house or manor in the area, requiring yet another visit, often involving many more miles of travelling and additional expense.

But visiting a location for a book such as this is absolutely vital. We wanted to be able to guide people to find their way, step by step through Anne’s world, equipping them not only with relevant knowledge of where to go and what to look at, but with practical information of where to eat, drink and rest. And so, all but a mere handful of the locations were visited in person, and we hope that having tried out a site in advance, your visit will be all the more rewarding. But more than this, it is only when you visit a place in person that you get a feel for a location, be it an empty field with only earthworks that give tell to its earlier, more illustrious history, or whether it be an extant building, where the very fabric of the walls remains behind to whisper its secrets to you. In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn was never going to be a dry academic text. We wanted it to be a rich and vivid trail of adventure that evokes all the senses for the time traveller. Our reactions to many of the places, the sights, sounds and feelings that were conjured up for us when we visited, are recorded in a very personal way in the visitor section of each entry.

Post publication, a small number of entries remain unchartered, with who knows how many more that may be unearthed over time. Our intention is to keep In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn alive by updating and adding additional entries as they come to light. We hope you will look forward to these, as much as we will enjoy researching them. On the meantime, save up you spending money, pack your bags and let your twenty-first century worries melt away in the midst of time. Anne is waiting to show you her life. So, what are you waiting for?

Dr Sarah Morris and Natalie Grueninger co-authors of In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn, published in September 2013. In the Footsteps is a guide book to all the places and artefacts associated with one of England’s most compelling and controversial queens.

Sarah is also the author of Le Temps Viendra: a novel of Anne Boleyn, Volumes I and II. Le Temps Viendra is a fictional biography telling the story of Anne’s innocence through the eyes of a modern day woman, drawn back in time, to find herself in the body of her historical heroine as Anne Boleyn’s dramatic story unfolds from triumph to disaster and its final, heart-wrenching conclusion on the scaffold. Volume I was published in 2012, with Volume II due out before the end of 2013. To find out more about Sarah’s research and writing visit:
www.letempsviendra.co.uk
www.facebook/LTViendra.com

Natalie Grueninger is a researcher, writer and educator, living in Australia with her husband and two children. She graduated from The University of NSW in 1998 with a Bachelor of Arts, with majors in English and Spanish and Latin American Studies and received her Bachelor of Teaching from The University of Sydney in 2006. Natalie has been working in public education for the last seven years and is passionate about making learning engaging and accessible for all children. In 2009 she created On the Tudor Trail, a website dedicated to documenting historic sites and buildings associated with Anne Boleyn and sharing information about the life and times of Henry VIII’s second wife. To find out more about Natalie’s research and writing visit:
www.onthetudortrail.com
www.nataliegrueninger.com

You can follow the next post tomorrow at www.queenanneboleyn.com

193 thoughts on “Researching “In The Footsteps of Anne Boleyn” – Guest Post by Natalie Grueninger and Sarah Morris”

  1. mrsfiennes says:

    I would love to read this book and I’m going to say my favorite Tudor place is Hampton Court Palace.

  2. mariella says:

    I do not know whether Hampton Court is mentioned in the book, but I think Anne must have really loved it.
    Mariella

  3. Mandy Goldstraw says:

    I love all things Tudor amd would love to read thos book. My favourite tudor place is hard to choose. However I do like Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire, built by Bessdof Hardwick, a formidable contemporary of Elizabeth 1 and wife of Mary Queen of Scots gaoler.”Hardwick Hall more glass than wall”.

  4. Lori Thomas says:

    Loved the article!! Nice to hear that updates will be added to the book. I so wish I could pack my bags and follow Anne =). Looking forward to the rest of the tour and would love to have a copy of this awesome book to add to my collection. Thx 4 the chance!! My favorite place would have to be Hampton Court

  5. Edwin Gumbley says:

    Hampton Court Palace.

  6. nikki says:

    I can’t wait to get my hands on this book! It’s hard to pick just one favorite Tudor location. I’m a fan of Hampton Court Palace and Sudeley Castle

  7. Ania says:

    my favourite Tudor place is Hampton Court.

  8. Robyne Ridge says:

    My favourite (currently ) Tudor spot is Hampton Court but I am intrigued by Henry’s presence in Chelsea.

  9. Dawn Notagiacomo says:

    I Can’t Decide Between Hever Castle Or The Tower Of London

  10. Amanda says:

    My favourite Tudor place is the Tower of London even though I’m not sure it was Anne’s!

  11. Kellie Flowerdew says:

    My favorite Tudor spot is Hever Castle.

  12. Anne says:

    Because I live in Australia and following my husband’s stroke, I may not be able to actually visit any of the places associated with Anne. As I have recently had the time to indulge my passion for the Tudor era and in particular Anne Boleyn I am very excited about the book. I would love a copy! My favourite places would be Hever Castle and Hampton Court.

  13. Pamela Kapustka says:

    Thanks for all your work & research, I can’t imagine how much time & effort and $ must have gone into this! But now, I can use your book as a reference and a temptation to cross-off England on my bucket list! I can’t wait to get my grubby little hands on a copy! I am really enjoying your “book tour”, as well, you always have such lovely photos and interesting little tidbits of info! 😉

    1. Pamela Kapustka says:

      I forgot to name my favorite Tudor Place! I think it would be Hever Castle, but Hampton Court, would probably be great to see as well! The most moving to me would be to see the Chappel of St. Peter et Vicula,, in The Tower, to say a prayerfor all the poor souls residing there….

  14. Ally says:

    My absolute favourite has to be Haddon Hall in Derbyshire. This is the must stunning, untouched Tudor home in Britain and is still owned by the original family. I would thoroughly recommend visiting it this month when the entire house is decorated, Tudor style for Christmas. The smell of freshly cut fir and clove studded oranges blends with the smoky log fires and the local choir sings contemporary Tudor Christmas carols in the Hall- very evocative and totally magical place!
    http://www.haddonhall.co.uk/

  15. Liz says:

    Wow! Thanks for a really fascinating read and those amazing photos! I had no idea she was associated with that many different places on the continent. You have made me want to visit now..

  16. Eliza says:

    My favourite Tudor places are the Tower of London and Hampton Court Palace!! They are lovely!!

  17. Karly says:

    Hever castle

    1. Rachel Addicoat says:

      Although I’ve never been outside of Australia, I would have to say Hever Castle would be my favourite Tudor place, as it is where Anne grew up, where her roots lie (although I know Blickling Hall is her family’s ancestral home too).

  18. Yvette Velez says:

    My favorite Tudor places are Hampton Court, Hever Castle and the Tower of London.

  19. Annie says:

    My husband and I have a list of Tudor places we want to visit, should we ever make the trip to England, Hampton Court is at the top of the list.

  20. Maxine says:

    My favorite place is Hampton Court. We were so lucky that the day we visited one of the guides took us to some of the behind the scenes places. We actually got to see a doorway that once led to the Queen’s section, and a wooden stairway that Henry VIII used. I would love to read this book and learn about other Tudor places.

  21. Denise Hansen says:

    So far I will say that my favourite Tudor place is Hampton Court. But inspired in part by “In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn” I am re-visiting England this fall, seeing Hever Castle for the first time and (joy of joys!) staying in Thornbury Castle in the Duke’s Bedchamber, the very room Henry VIII stayed in where on progress with Anne in 1535. Her quarters were directly below and are now the dining room and library of this 5-star hotel but I am sure Anne spent some time in Henry’s room too (LOL), Can’t wait, It is a huge splurge but what the heck!

  22. Denise leffingwell says:

    Hever Castle or Hampton court.

  23. Kathy says:

    I can’t decide between Hever Castle or the Tower of London! So amazing!

  24. Abbie says:

    My favourite has to be Hampton Court. I just think it so beautiful and would love to visit it.

  25. Jenny Hullett says:

    Hampton Court would be my fav.

  26. Janice says:

    Looking forward to this book. I would say my favorite Tudor place is Hever Castle. Beautiful and just lovely to actually walk in Anne’s footsteps.

  27. Kathryn Stewart says:

    My favorite place to feel close to Anne Boleyn is the chapel of St Peter ad Vingula. She is THERE. And all my feelings about her, about her life, her influence on history floods me with so many emotions in that quiet chapel. Although I love Hever Castle and Hampton Court, I know she is gone from those halls–she is there with me in St Peters.

  28. Lynn Doxey says:

    My favorite Tudor place would have to be Hampton Court. So much history abounds there and would love to visit. Your book will provide the best substitution for actually standing where Wolsey, Henry, Anne and according to legend…Catherine Howard still does.

  29. Sarah says:

    I think Hampton Court Palace. I would love to go there one day. It’d be so much fun to imagine them walking around in their beautiful gowns and jewelry. Im sure it had to have been a favorite of Anne Boleyn!

  30. Cheryl says:

    I would love to visit Hampton Court Palace! So beautiful!!!

  31. Nancy says:

    My favorite Tudor place is the Tower of London, followed by Hever Castle as a close second!

  32. Elizabeth says:

    Visiting the UK is very high on my Bucket List! Having books such as these would absolutely make my trip the best ever!!! The Tudors and the time period have intrigued me since childhood and I love the daily updates.

  33. Jill says:

    I’m obsessed with the Tower apartments for some reason.

  34. Paula Renk says:

    Not sure what my favorite is…..I cannot wait to visit them all…!!

  35. MARY says:

    My favorite place is the Tower

  36. Alan Wybrow says:

    The most interesting place within the Tudor realm and the key place I want to visit is Hampton Court Palace.The history of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, their lives and the history created there still resides within its walls.

  37. Lisa says:

    My favourite place has to be Hampton Court Palace. I just loved it there. The actors in full costume, playing Anne, Henry and many others were just incredible and really made the place come alive, so much fun.

  38. Laura says:

    Hever Castle in Kent is absolutely stunning!

  39. Hever Castle! Stepping over the drawbridge and into the courtyard in Anne and Henry’s footsteps was thrilling for my sister and me, two American Anne-o-philes. I love to remember that romantic and royal experience!

  40. Mary Winston says:

    Hever Castle, because its haunted!

  41. Julie Kammerzell says:

    There are so many Tudor places that I admire. I would have to say Hampton Court Palace.

  42. Sue says:

    Definitely Hever Castle.. I have been 3 times in my life in spring, summer and fall. The perfect little castle…..a moat, a drawbridge and cobblestone courtyard…. and the Boleyn family home.

  43. Mary Winston says:

    p.s. I always love the Advent Calendar!! Thanks!!

  44. Leigh says:

    My favorites would be Hampton Court Palace, Hever Castle , The Tower of London.
    I hope to come to the UK in a couple of years. Saving my pennies.

  45. I cannot wait to read this book and discover new places associated with Henry VIII and Queen Anne as well as learn more about palaces themselves, their layouts and workings…

    Picking a favorite is difficult: I love Hampton Court (its those kitchens), but I also love Dover Castle, stark and cold now but once so alive and host to so many, including Henry and Anne.

  46. To the moment I must say Hampton Court is my favourite Tudor palace. I have been lucky enough to go twice. I would love to see Hever Castle, but must wait for my next trip across the pond for it.
    I am intrigued by the idea for your book and would love to win a copy.

  47. Shannon says:

    My favorite Tudor place is Hever Castle. One of these days, I’ll take a your of all the Tudor palaces, but I am most looking forward to visiting Hever Castle.

  48. Catarina says:

    The book looks so interesting!

    I’d say my favourite Tudor place is Hever Castle!

  49. Jenn says:

    Every day I sit down an read the articles published on here love reading them my favored place of Anne Boleyn mmmm that’s a good one because I can’t pick a favored one cause I love them all

  50. Lauren says:

    My favorite Tudor place has to be Hever Castle. As Anne’s childhood home, it’s offers a look into Anne’s life before she ever caught Henry VIII’s eye and that makes it more interesting to me than any other place Anne visited or lived. Not to mention how pretty and cozy the castle itself looks; I can’t wait till the time comes where I can visit it myself.

  51. Susan says:

    Hampton Court has always been my favourite Tudor place. I’ve been wanting to visit since I was a youngster.

  52. Mac Daly says:

    While I love Hampton Court, my favorite Anne Boleyn place is the Tudor Room at the National Portrait Gallery in London. I felt like I was visiting old friends walking amongst all those familiar paintings.

  53. Nikki says:

    The book sounds like an interesting new way to review the history. My favourite place is also Hampton court. I even feel I know my way around! However I haven’t yet managed to visit Hever castle although I keep meaning to.

  54. maritzal says:

    Wow I’d love to read the book my favorite Tudor Place Hever castle maritzal

  55. Carol Reid says:

    Living in America I have not had the pleasure of visiting England I hope to some day. I am a lover of both history and architecture especially the York and Tudor eras. This book would be a great way to read about all of the places Anne visited and dream of my trip. I think Hever Castle and The Tower of London would be 2 places I would definitely want to visit!

  56. Carol Reid says:

    Oops I did not mean to uncheck notify me of follow-up comments posted by email.

  57. Cheryl says:

    I so look forward to reading this book. My favorite places are Hever Castle and The Tower of London. Thank you for the opportunity.

  58. Beth Lynch says:

    I am very much looking forward to reading this book! I live in America so haven’t had the opportunity to visit any of these locations, but overall I think Hampton Court Palace is my favorite.

  59. Tiki says:

    I too would be interested in reading this book. The first Tudor residence that came to mind is Hatfield House. I like to think of a young Elizabeth living here and being educated to become the amazing woman she would be; it was here too that she received the news of her ascension.

  60. Mary says:

    My favorite Tudor spot is Hever Castle because Anne spent her childhood there and I think it would have been her favorite place too.Moreover it is a beautiful place,located in a beautiful area.

  61. Cathy Michelbrink says:

    I absolutely cannot choose. I’m from the USA and have never been across the pond. I read all the time about The Tudors. I am obsessed with Elizabeth I. Watched The Tudors. Watched the old VHS the six wives of Henry VIII. wow, what acting that was. I guess Hampton Court would have to be my pick.

    Thank you!

  62. Elizabeth P. says:

    This book sounds very well researched and impressive. What an adventure they had! My favorite Tudor place would probably have to be Hampton Court because of all the history it holds.

  63. Jennifer Huelsebusch says:

    I traveled to London for the first time this past Spring. I absolutely loved Hampton Court Palace and will add these other stops to my list for my next trip.

  64. Tina Tipton says:

    Rochester Castle is my favorite Tudor location. It is just a shell now. Walking from the river bank, across the green and into the castle was a wonderful experience. Did my feet step on the same ground as Anne of Cleves or Henry VIII? It was one of the few places I felt a vital connection to these people I had read about for so very long.

  65. Anne Barnhill says:

    This is a wonderful article and the book is terrific! I can’t wait to use it when I come to England–I’m hoping 2014 will be my year!

  66. Caren says:

    I think I would choose Hever castle. Since not a lot is known of Anne’s early life it would be interesting to go there try to imagine what she did as a young child and how it helped to shape the person she became.

  67. catherine says:

    Hever tops my list. Atmospheric, beautiful, you can feel the ghosts!

  68. Michelle_B. says:

    My favourite Tudor site is Hever Castle…so beautiful, tranquil, nostalgic and with a happy atmosphere…think AB must have been happy here! Thanks!

  69. Colm Gallagher says:

    The Tower of London for me. Full of jaw dropping history

  70. Daniela says:

    My favourite Tudor place is Anne Boleyns childhood home, Hever Castle in Kent. It’s such a lovely spot to visit. The Castle itself isn’t too big and you can really imagine the Boleyn family living there. I love the fact that my favourite film, Anne of the Thousand days was filmed there, with a lot of scenes showing the castle and grounds off very well. The Italian gardens, although more contemporary with the beautiful rose garden are a real pleasure to explore in every season of the year. I have visited this castle countless times both as a child and an adult. Most recently I took my son there too and took him there as a baby at Christmas time. It’s become a family tradition to visit this castle at least once a year and I must say I never ever tire of visiting it.

  71. Rebecca Zimmerman says:

    Hampton Court so far is my favorite Tudor place.

  72. Alan says:

    I have a VERY pleasant memory of a day spent at Hever Castle. The weather was glorious and the location had enought to be interesting -and is quite lovely-(grounds are beautiful) Another blessing was that it was not over crowded as some of the London sites can be. I would certainly encourage any fan of Anne’s to visit Hever.

  73. Christie Conley says:

    My favorite Tudor place is the Tower of London.I am hoping to go there and see it in person one of these days !

  74. Wendy says:

    This trip sounds amazing. My favorite Tudor site associated with Anne Boleyn is Hampton Court, although The Tower is a close second. I haven’t made it to Hever yet and since I live in New Jersey, it’s a long trip.

  75. Holly says:

    I went to Hampton Court for the first time back in October and I absolutely loved it. The great hall with the one remaining entwined HA was amazing!

  76. Jeanine says:

    My favorite place in Tudor times is Palace of Placentia (also known as Greenwich Palace) where both Henry VIII and Elizabeth I were born.

    1. Jeanine says:

      Sadly the palace now has a university on the site but from drawings I’ve seen of what it might have looked like, makes me think that it must have been amazing!

  77. Mer says:

    My favorite is Hampton Court – the chapel in particular.

  78. Nathalie says:

    My favourite Tudor Place would be Windsor Castle, but I also would love to visit Hampton Court Palace!!

  79. Becky Bunsic says:

    I would love a copy of this book. The place I would most like to visit is Hever Castle.

  80. I would have to say that my favorite Tudor palace is Hampton Court. I ca’t wait to read the book, as an author myself I can relate to your passion for not only the people that you write about but also the passion for the truth.

  81. Maria says:

    Hampton Court is my favorite, very beautiful and definitely a must when visiting London.

  82. Janet F says:

    There are so many places to choose from, but I loved visiting Hever because I could imagine the young Anne meeting Henry there in the grounds.

  83. Annette P says:

    As I have only been to the Tower, and spent some time contemplating the scaffold and thinking of her bravery as well as the night before her coronation, it is the Tower. One day I’ll visit Hever, and bet that will take over!

  84. Leslie says:

    What a beautiful concept! I love this “…or whether it be an extant building, where the very fabric of the walls remains behind to whisper its secrets to you”. A woman’s childhood home remains with her always. As such, I would have to choose Hever.

  85. Ashley says:

    I would love to read this book! I would love to see Hampton Court the most I think. Although I did enjoy walking around the Tower of London.

  86. Jennifer C. says:

    It must be amazing to walk where the Tudors walked! 🙂

  87. Elaine says:

    Love that Amboise is right next to the river. What an amazing adventure these ladies had in their research for this book. I’ve never had much desire to visit Europe but I believe this book would have me start my own journey back in time!

  88. Trinette Cox says:

    Hand down, has to be Never Castle in winter w a fresh blanket of snow!

  89. Trinette Cox says:

    Ugh..autocorrect…Hever. not Never lol

  90. Miranda says:

    Hi my name is Miranda Reed. I would love to visit The Tower of London and Visit the place where Anne Boleyn is baried. I wish i could get the In The Footsteps of Anne Boleyn. I have always wanted to visit England.

  91. Camille says:

    My favorite Tudor place would have to be the Tower of London.
    I’d love a copy of In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn.

  92. Sandy says:

    What an amazing glimpse into what promises to be a fabulous read! Thank you for the chance to win a copy. To walk in the footsteps of such intriguing historical figures is mind-blowing to a gal from Texas, USA but it would be magnificent! Hampton Court would be delightful to see, but I would HAVE to see the Tower of London because that is where Anne spent her last days. I would imagine that to be a sobering experience for me when I think of all the prayers Anne must have whispered there. I’d really love to win the book, but I wish good luck to all!

  93. Leslie says:

    I would just love to go to England and explore Hampton Court, Hever Palace would be neat too!

  94. Hayley says:

    My favourite would have to be Hever. I think its just stunning and happily situated.

  95. Hayley says:

    My favourite would have to be Hever. I think its just stunning and happily situated.

  96. BanditQueen says:

    Loved the book; have been to some of the places that they have mentioned in the book in connection with Anne, Henry and associates. Its a pity Anne did not come north with Henry; I would love to have a local Anne Boleyn connected house. We do have a lovely Tudor house Speke Hall and Rufford Old Hall is early Tudor; and a couple of other houses in places around Cheshire and Yorkshire and Lancashire, but sadly none directly connected with Anne. Having said this; there is a house close to Chester; (sorry cannot recall name but can find out) that belonged to Francis Weston, one of the men accused with her. It is in private hands but do remember something on a website last year about it.

    Thank you for sharing the histories and the pictures and the stories that make these stones and brick buildings into living places. My favourite place in the places I have been to was Arundal Castle, but my favouite palace was Hampton Court; the entire experience is great and the living history makes it all the more special. I too have found in collecting guide books to various places; a personal passion of mine that some of the best information and rare pictures that capture the way places were in the past exist in old books. One of the best books on old palaces is on the old palace of whitehall and it has many rare and old pictures and many stories and history that is not in the normal modern books or the new guide books. Rare and beautiful and lovely pictures. Thank you again for this collection. It is excellent.

    1. BanditQueen says:

      P.S sorry Sir William Brereton not Francis Weston came from a family connected to many places in Cheshire; Brereton Hall being one of them and the old Stockwick Castle in Wirral that is barely a ruin now. The hall is/was near Sandbach and the family had connections all over the county. St Mary’s Church also close to the Hall has many effigies of the family there. There are a number of good websites but Brereton.org has the full story Breretons of Cheshire and Chester 360 mentions connections and other lovely Tudor properties all around the place.

      Cheers and thanks for a great article and a great book.

  97. Sheridan says:

    My place of choice is Hampton Court Palace!

  98. Shar Clark says:

    My husband and I were in England about three years ago, and we visited The Tower of London and Hampton Court Palace. They were fabulous! It started my love affair with the Tudors and especially, Anne Boleyn. We’ve been wanting to come back ever since! I can’t wait to plan another trip back to see more Tudor history. I especially want to see Hever Castle. I’ve been looking for a book to help us plan a great trip!

  99. Ann Russell says:

    My favorite Tudor place is the Henry VII chapel at Westminster Abbey. That is the closest I can get to Elizabeth I. It is also my choice for the burial of Richard III, but I don’t think I will get anywhere. I would love to visit the Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula. I have been to the Tower, but the chapel was not open for visits.

  100. Anne Beschle says:

    I would love to visit the Tower of London. Anne was there before her coronation and before her execution. Both situations would have been times of high emotion for her and I am sure she left a strong sense of her presence. Just to stand, be still and absorb the atmosphere – wow!

  101. charles shene says:

    Choosing a favorite tudor palace is hard. At first I thought i might like White Hall palace best but maybe Nonsuch is more my type of place. YES i choose NONSUCH. thanks

    1. BanditQueen says:

      I would have loved to have seen Nonuch in its heyday when the Tudor Palace was there; I have been to the park, seen the plan and the 18th century house; still a lovely place; and some of the finds in the Museum of London from the extensive archaology done several years ago. I do not think there was a more lovely palace, even if it was very Italianate in its decoration. The models and special effects reconstructions of the palace in the Tudors give a good glympse of the palace and there are drawings of how it looked, it must have been a beautiful place to live and wander through the grounds. It is such a pity that most of the Tudor palaces and even Tudor parts of palaces have vanished.

  102. Debbie B says:

    Wow so pleased to have found this site. Mt favourite Tudor property is one very close to me – Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire. Why? Because it just defies gravity – it shouldn’t still be standing. And the moat is perfect. It’s a National Trust property and if you’ve never seen it, do look it up online as I can’t believe you won’t love it on sight.

  103. Joy B says:

    The Tower isn’t Tudor, but it is endlessly interesting. My favorite.

  104. Bonnie says:

    I have a question. You refer to Anne as queen consort. I was under the impression that Anne’s coronation was to crown her queen in her own right, not just consort. I know she and Catherine of Aragon were the only two of Henry’s queens to be so crowned. No doubt you know better than I, but I would appreciate if you could clarify this for me. Thanks!

    1. Dawn 1st says:

      If I’ve got this right Bonnie, a Queen consort is the wife of the reigning King being crowned doesn’t give her any more rights, she shares his rank and titles but not his sovereignty/official powers .
      Queen Regnant, like Mary and Elizabeth, is when they inherited the throne, they rule in their own right, husbands would remain a Prince/Prince Consort, again he shares her rank and titles but not her sovereignty/official powers. To have him crowned would rank him over her…

  105. Claire Summers says:

    Hever castle

  106. Mili Foerstner says:

    My favorite Tudor place has to be Hever Castle and the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula, the home of Anne and her resting place.
    I´m from Argentina and I didn´t have the chance yet to visit london, but the book of Natalie and Sarah would be an excellent compensation until I can travel! 😉 I must read this book!!
    I just hope I could win it !!!
    Thanks Claire to share this book with all of us!!
    A warm hug and kisses from a fan of yours!!! 🙂

  107. Kim Cree says:

    I cannot wait to read this book! Thanks for the giveaway!
    I would have to say Hampton Court Palace is my favorite Tudor place. 🙂

  108. Dawn 1st says:

    If the Tudor connection is about Anne, it has to be Hever Castle, otherwise its Gainsborough Old Hall, a beautiful building.
    What a fantastic journey you ladies had, I bet there are many of us envious of such a vocational trip.

  109. Cesar L. says:

    I would love to read this book….a brillant idea for a book!
    My favourite Tudor place is Hampton Court I think…. but there are so wonderfull places, it´s impossible to pick just one! 😉
    Thanks Natalie, Sarah and of course to Claire!!!

  110. Bertilde F. says:

    I would love a copy of this book. The place I would most like to visit is Hever Castle.
    Thank you!!! 😉

  111. Marcia Gutierrez says:

    There are so many places to choose from, but I loved visiting Hever because I could imagine the young Anne meeting Henry there in the grounds. soooo fantastic!!!! 🙂

  112. Euge G. says:

    My favorite Tudor place would have to be the Tower of London.
    I’d love a copy of In the Footsteps of Anne Boleyn.

  113. Vivian Bruno says:

    My favourite would have to be Hever. I think its just stunning and happily situated.
    I would love to win a copy of this book!!!
    pleaseeee pick mee!!! 😉

  114. Horace Eusebi says:

    I would love to see Hampton Court the most I think. Although I did enjoy walking around the Tower of London.
    I would love to read this book and learn about other Tudor places. Thanks Claire to share with us!!! 😉

  115. Roxane D.L. says:

    Choosing a favorite tudor palace is hard. At first I thought i might like White Hall palace best but maybe Hever castle is more my type of place. 🙂

  116. Kathleen Carothers says:

    Hampton Court would be my choice should I ever get over there to see it. I am planning on this summer but at age 78 have got to get my walking skills up to par before I go! I love this Web site and all the very interesting articles. Thank you so much. K.A.C.

  117. Bety V. says:

    My place of choice is Hampton Court Palace!
    Thank you so much Claire to share with us this excellent book!!!!

  118. Belen Espinola says:

    The most interesting place in the Tudor era, is in my opinion, Hampton Court Palace.The history of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, their lives and the history created there still resides within its walls. Just a fairy tales… 🙂
    Thank you claire for the chance to win this interesting book!

  119. Natalie Blythman says:

    This trip sounds amazing. My favorite Tudor site associated with Anne Boleyn is Hampton Court, although The Tower is a close second. I haven’t made it to Hever yet and since I live in Argentina, it’s a long trip.;)

  120. Vero I. says:

    This book sounds very well researched and impressive. What an adventure they had! My favorite Tudor place would probably have to be Hampton Court because of all the history it holds.

  121. Lydia Shoffstall says:

    I would say my favorite is Hampton Court!

  122. Carmen Leiva says:

    Looking forward to this book. I would say my favorite Tudor place is Hever Castle. Beautiful and just lovely to actually walk in Anne’s footsteps.
    Thank you Claire for the chance to win this book!

  123. Gaby MDO says:

    The book sounds like an interesting new way to review the history.
    My favourite place is (as many of tudors fans) Hampton court!!! 😉

  124. Ari Tomeo says:

    I think I would choose Hever castle. Since not a lot is known of Anne’s early life it would be interesting to go there…

  125. Susana Rodriguez says:

    Loved the article!!. Looking forward to the rest of the tour and would love to have a copy of this awesome book. Thanks for the chance!!
    My favorite place would have to be Hampton Court

  126. Domingo T. says:

    I can’t wait to get my hands on this book! It’s hard to pick just one favorite Tudor location. But if I had to choose it they would be: Hampton Court Palace and Sudeley Castle.

  127. Stefani T. says:

    My favorite Tudor spot is Hever Castle because Anne spent her childhood there and I think it would have been her favorite place too.

  128. Yani Goncalvez says:

    I do not know whether Hampton Court is mentioned in the book, but I think Anne must have really loved it. I would love to visit it someday. But in the meantime it would be great to read this book!

  129. Alicia Kennedy says:

    I think my favourite place would be Hever Castle, though Hampton Court is a place that fascinates me also! I love the effort you have put into this book, and so want to read it!

  130. For some reason Westminster Abbey is my choice for favorite Tudor place 🙂 I guess beautiful churches are fascinating to me. There is usually beautiful artwork and meaning in them.

    1. Stephanie westerfield says:

      I agree! I can spend hours at Westminster Abbey! So much to see!

  131. Jasmine says:

    I would love to visit Hampton Court one day, all I know of it thus far has been from books

  132. Katie Rodriguez says:

    I would love to have this wonderful book! To read about and see all of these special places associated with Anne throughout her life would just be amazing. Ever since I’ve began to become interested in Anne Boleyn and her story I’ve wanted to see all of the places she had been and lived her life. My favorite places would have to be Hever Castle and Hampton Court. I always wonder how she felt in both places that she lived. How would she feel the same and how would she feel different in each one!

  133. Stephanie westerfield says:

    I would have to say the chapel at the Tower. The guide showed us where Anne is buried.

  134. Daniel Chapman says:

    For me it’s a tie between Hampton Court and Nonsuch Palace. Ever since I was young both stole my heart through my first visit (of many) to Hampton Court) and the illustrations and accounts of Nonsuch, both have stolen my imagination.

  135. Madison says:

    My favorite place is the Tower of London, not just because it is so enriched in Tudor History, but it has been a building of such prominent importance in other era’s as well.

  136. Sharon Anderson says:

    Hever…….her home…where she I am sure felt safe…that is my favorite place….

  137. Lauren Gent says:

    Picking my number favourite Tudor place is extremely hard as I have two one Tower of London and the other Hampton Court Palace. If I have to chose, it would probably have to be Hampton Court Palace. Can’t wait to read this book 🙂

  138. Robyn Van Sanford says:

    I have to say without doubt my favorite is The Tower of London! So much history happened there! I got chills on my visit there. In fact 1 day wasn’t enough, I dragged my poor husband back to the tower the next day instead of moving on to Hampton Court
    ( which I’m very sorry to have missed), as I hadn’t seen EVERYTHING yet! I needed to see every cell, to imagine all the amazing people who had set foot there before me. And I just had to see the Church and the resting place of a few of Henry’s Queens and the others…including Lady Jane Grey who I also think got a raw deal as well! –ok they all did!
    But anyway I’d choose The Tower!

  139. Elrine Greig says:

    In darkest South Africa, The Anne Boleyn Files shed a grand, encouraging light on possibilities, even in the cruellist times. Thank you.

  140. Rick says:

    I am lucky in the respect that when i look left from my lounge window i get too see the recently restored shurland hall(belonging in tudor times to sir thomas cheney)i believe Henry and Anne spent a few days here at some point,im wondering if this is mentioned in the book?its basesd in the village of Eastchurch on the isle of sheppey in kent.

  141. Emi C. says:

    I would love to have this wonderful book! To read about and see all of these special places associated with Anne throughout her life would just be amazing.
    The tudor place I would like to visit is Hever and the tower of London (The Chapel St. Peter ad Vincula) …
    Thanks for this chance to win this excellent book!

  142. Carolina Estivil says:

    I think it would be Hever Castle, but Hampton Court, would probably be great to see as well! The most moving to me would be to see the Chappel of St. Peter ad Vicula, in The Tower.
    I mention 3 places… sorry but It´s really hard to say just one!
    Thanks Claire!!!!!

  143. Ordas Andres says:

    It must be amazing to walk where the Tudors walked! 🙂 My favourite Tudor place is Hampton court!
    I´m crossing my fingers for a chance to win a copy of this book!!

  144. Yohanna Udrizard says:

    If I have to pick a place that would be Hever, her home, where she I am sure felt safe…
    that is my favorite place….
    Thank you so much Claire, since I discover your page a couple of weeks ago, it was the solution to all my problems…. 🙂

  145. Dina C. says:

    I cannot wait to read this book! Thanks for the giveaway!
    I would have to say Hampton Court Palace is my favorite Tudor place. 🙂

  146. Laura Pintos says:

    For me it’s a tie between Hampton Court and Nonsuch Palace.
    Ever since I was young both stole my heart through my first visit…That was long ago…
    Thank you Claire, Natalie and Sarah for this giveaway!

  147. Estrella says:

    Hampton court is beautiful!

  148. Flavi Terra says:

    My favourite Tudor site is Hever Castle, so beautiful, tranquil, nostalgic and with a happy atmosphere, I think Anne must have been really happy here!
    Thank you so much for this giveaway and good luck to everyone!

  149. Miguel Angel Cruzado says:

    Hampton Court is my favorite, very beautiful and definitely a must when visiting London.

  150. Adolf M. says:

    What an amazing glimpse into what promises to be a fabulous read!
    Thank you for the chance to win a copy.
    As many of others, I think Hever castle is a must see of Tudor places….

  151. Coky G. says:

    Picking a favorite is difficult: I love Hampton Court, but I also love Dover Castle, stark and cold now but once so alive and host to so many, including Henry and Anne.

  152. NADIA Gomez says:

    Thanks for all your work & research, I can’t imagine how much time and effort must have gone into this!….. Thank you Sarah and Natalie!
    The place I would love to visit is Hever!

  153. Greta G says:

    I love all things Tudor and would love to read this book. My favourite tudor place is hard to choose. However I do like Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire

  154. Sophie Gomez says:

    I would love to read this book!
    I would love to see Hampton Court the most I think. Although I did enjoy walking around the Tower of London. 🙂
    Thanks Claire for this giveaway!!!!

  155. Facundo Cosme says:

    I´m really happy to have found this site.
    My favourite Tudor place is the property call Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire, It´s just awesome, I don´t know if anyone had the chance to see it…
    Thank you Claire!!

  156. Clau Minnig says:

    I would love to visit the Tower of London. Anne was there before her coronation and before her execution. Both situations would have left a strong sense of her presence.

  157. Gail Kraus says:

    I find all of this so interesting! Growing up I could not stand history of any kind, now I’m finding it intriguing…guessing it’s due to finding something that’s interests me…like this! I keep getting drawn in further and further! I absolutely LOVE it!

  158. Peter Russo says:

    I think Hampton Court Palace. I would love to go there one day. It’d be so much fun to imagine them walking around…

  159. Guille Espinola says:

    My wife and I would love to read this book and I’m going to say my favorite Tudor place is Hampton Court Palace. I would be a dream come to to take my wife there! In the meanwhile the book will do it! 😉

  160. Chelsea N E F says:

    I think my favorite Tudor place would be Tyburn. I know it’s morbid! But it was a part of life then, and kind of helps to ground me in the times.

  161. Michelle says:

    My favorite Tudor place is Hampton Court.

  162. Richard Hartman says:

    I have yet to visit England, but when I do Hever Castle is on the top of my list. I would love to add this book to my “Tudor Shelf”

  163. MarnieRose says:

    I would also love to read this book! I really want to see Hever castle. It just looks so beautiful. I would also have loved to see Nonsuch.

  164. heidibullen says:

    Mine is Hever castle. I still get eery feelings when i visit. But also southsea castle, for the main reason Henry 8th came to my home town and watched one of his ships there. Unfortunately, she is now housed in the dockyard where i actually worked in a building not far from her, brought me that little bit closer to H8 rather than my favorite person A.B. But still a nice thought he was close by but 500 years ago.

  165. Tudor Rose says:

    I have enjoyed the research and reading through the articles that have been written and seeing the busts of Anne Boleyn! In her coronation robes and coronation crown not to mention the ones of her in her chemise and petticoats and corsets o and her famous B necklace! 🙂

  166. Barb says:

    I would love one day to see the Tower of London and the chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula. I have never been to England and would love to visit some day. Perhaps if I would read this book I would feel as if I had.

  167. giovanna g. says:

    The most beautiful place is Hever Castle.

  168. Anyanka says:

    Hampton Court or Winsdor Castle since I’ve visited them the most when I lived near London.

    Though I wish I had visited Acton Court when I live in Wiltshire.

  169. Ludmila Gonzalez says:

    Hi Claire!
    As many of us here, I would love to read this book! I live in Argentina, and I didn´t have the chance to travel to Great Britain, so this book would be a great confort! 😉
    I really want to see Hever castle, It just looks so peacefull… It would be my dream come true!
    In the meantime… I cross my fingers for a copy of this excellent book!

  170. Ines Eusebi says:

    Claire, my daughter and I are both great fans of your page! Thanks for this chance!!!
    I think the Tudor place we would love to visit is any of them….From Hampton Court to Hever and the Tower of London!
    I´m a high school history teacher and this book would make an excellent Christmas gift for both of us!
    Good luck and keep on doing what you do the best…The Anne Boleyn Files!!! 😉

  171. Jessica Monaghan says:

    Hampton, and the Tower

  172. Shelley St.Pierre says:

    My favourite Tudor Place is Hever Castle. It is also my favourite castle that I had the fortune of seeing in person.

  173. Linda Davies says:

    Love all things Tudor but Hever Castle is the one place which brings Anne alive to me – to walk where she walked – to touch a wall that she may have touched – spine tingling!!

  174. Sandra says:

    The Tower of London…I’ve been there at night and can imagine what it must have been like so long ago on a dark and stormy night (but I’m beginning to sound like Snoopy! )

  175. Jane says:

    Aha, I see that some of you have had the good taste to come up to beautiful Derbyshire. This Derbyshire lass can confirm how special Haddon Hall and Hardwick Hall are, and both are within half an hour or less of where I live – as indeed are the imposing ruins of Wingfield Manor and the still very much lived in Chatsworth, the Palace of The Peak. None of them have any particular association with Anne, although all of them except Haddon have had Mary Queen of Scots as a not very willing guest! But Haddon in particular is so unspoilt that it is not at all difficult to imagine Anne gliding along the galleries and through the gardens. I have never been to Hever, but I from what I have seen in pictures I would think it is similar in size to Haddon, albeit Haddon is up on a hill. That’s why I think Anne would like it!

    I’d encourage visitors from abroad as well as at home to take in Derbyshire, there is a large amount of Tudor history waiting for you. Good food and beautiful scenery too!

  176. Klaudia says:

    Tower of London! I’ve never been there but I would love to!!

  177. Candice says:

    My favourite Tudor palace is Hampton court palace. I try to visit it every time I’m in uk.

  178. W J Williams says:

    Tower of London,Hampton Court Palace my favorite place to visit.

  179. Never been to England, but it is a dream of mine to visit one day. I have to say Hever Castle would be my favorite place.

  180. margaret says:

    For me my favourite would be all of them ,in fact anything tudor would do ,but i am getting this book somehow ,if not lucky enough to win it i will just go straight out and buy it,anyway fingers crossed.

  181. Helen H says:

    While Hampton Court I have visited and loved, I would have to say my favorite if Hever Castle, where it all began!

  182. Suzanne says:

    Hever Castle is my favorite

  183. Mary the Quene says:

    I wish I could have been a crumb in your pocket(s) as this research was done. Most especially as you followed Anne Boleyn’s ‘trail’ through her pre-Henry VIII years in France. To my mind, that must have been Anne at her truest character; studying, worshiping, being a young woman of privilege allowed to serve and form her own self amongst other women.

    I prefer to think of her before Henry VIII cast his eye upon her.

    I don’t think I can choose a favorite Tudor residence; all of them have something special so I will have to vote that I love them all the same.

  184. Krishna Rose says:

    Personally I love all the Tudor Palaces, but my favorite has to be Hatfield House, where the Princess, later, Queen Elizabeth 1 was residing as a child. It’s a beautiful place, and I lived close to Hatfield as a child myself, and have wonderful memories of visiting the small Palace every year with my school.

  185. Tɦіs is my first time go to see at here and i am truly pleassant to read all at one place.

  186. Zilpa Bat Levi says:

    A stunning idea for a book, but perhaps the caption to the photograph of the lane leading up to Canterbury Cathedral could correctly identify Mercery Lane in any future editions, Butchery Lane is one street further southwest.

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