Close To You (Emotional Attachments to the Tudors) | Off Topic Chit-Chat | Forum

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Close To You (Emotional Attachments to the Tudors)
June 7, 2010
10:34 am
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I fell for the Tudors when I was a kid — Elizabeth was the first one I ever read about when I was in about the second grade, and our American history book (on the section on Exploration of the New World) told of a lovely redheaded queen trying to decide whether or not to marry the King of Spain. Masterpiece Theater's airings of The Six Wives of Henry VIII and Elizabeth R didn't “help” — and off I went on my Tudor obsession (with a family I know only somewhat better than the Corleones of The Godfather fame LOL).

So when I finally made it to England in 2000 and spent 3 weeks doing my personal “Tudor pilgrimmage” I started feeling real close to these real people I had read so much about. I'm curious — has there been a moment (if you've had a chance) when you visited a location connected to the Tudors in some way and you felt very close to that person? I'm not necessarily talking about seeing or sensing ghosts, but just the idea that you were touched by them in an emotional level.

For me —

1) Seeing the letter that Elizabeth wrote to half-sister Mary before she was sent to the Tower. There were all those lines Elizabeth drew in the empty spaces so no one would try to insert something more.

2) Standing — alone one morning — in the chapel where Katherine Parr is buried at Sudeley Castle, and having a chance to touch the marble hands on her tomb, and ask out loud if she had any idea how great her stepdaughter became.

3) Seeing Anne Boleyn's handwriting in her Book of Hours (at Hever).

4) Relaxing on the spot at Hatfield where Elizabeth learned she was queen (I know the original tree is gone, but it didn't matter; I sat beside the new tree planted by her namesake and let myself drift), and then taking a quick stroll over to the Great Hall where she had her first council meeting.

5) Seeing the plaque at St. George's Chapel announcing that Henry VIII was buried in the sarcophagus below me.

6) Elizabeth's tomb at Westminster Abbey

7) Walking through the gardens at Hatfield, Hever and Sudeley Castle. (I swear the same little bird kept following me around LOL)

8) Spending 2 nights at Thornbury Castle on the Welsh border and knowing Henry and Anne stayed there in “happier times.”

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 9, 2010
5:46 am
Avatar
Jenny
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 45
Member Since:
February 8, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Tina,

I went “hook, line and sinker” for Elizabeth at an extremely early age.  My mother had 10 children, I being the 7th and so as she was constantly pregnant, I didn't really get to know her until much later on.  There were also too many elder sisters in the kitchen and from an extremely early age I was taught to read, write, sew (at which I was never proficient) and knit and put in a corner in the living room to be out of the way of the daily running of the household.  I was the only girl (six) with red hair and was teased from the moment I remember about that and I was extremely shy.  To read, at the age of 3 or 4 about a queen with red hair who was Britain's greatest monarch certainly helped me on my journey!!!!

I am still very much in touch with Historic Royal Palaces in London and had the honour of being invited to Hampton Court Palace a few years ago to “dine” with HVIII and Catherine of Aragon which was an amazing experience.

However, my main territory is now selliing go as you please tours round teh Norwegian Fjords and because of my colouring mosst Spaniards think I am Norwegian in any case.  I am sure the “red hair” comes from Viking stock as I know my mother's ancester were from Normandy which was Viking territory at one time.

But back to Elizabeth, I have always held her in high esteem and as a role model for myself

June 9, 2010
11:59 am
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline


Hi back Jenny and what a fantastic story. Smile You couldn't have chosen a better role model, and especially one that shared your red hair!! I have always held her in high esteem myself, I guess because she managed to not only be a great leader in her own right, but at the time, remained unmarried despite the criticism. I know that's not unusual now, but in the 16th century — WOW! (I mean, even Victoria was required to start thinking of a husband and did so; I was kind of surprised — when I saw Young Victoria with Emily Blunt — that she hinted that she might do as Elizabeth and remain unwed. You have to wonder what would have happened in history if she had done so and a few things come to mind, but that's another story). Anyway Jenny, I appreciate you sharing that with us. I didn't come from a large family, but books and movies became my best friends due to me feeling like an outsider as a kid. Looking back, I'm glad it turned out that way or I might have missed a lot!

Oh and the Henry/Catherine dinner at Hampton Court (which I love) sounds great!

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 9, 2010
2:18 pm
Avatar
Wendy
UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 47
Member Since:
June 1, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Last year I went to the British Library to see the Henry VIII Man & Monarch Exhibition. I was surrounded by Henry's belongings, and original portraits of his family that I had only previously seen in books or on TV.  The letters to Rome regarding the 'King's Great Matter', and the love letters written by Anne & Henry to each other were inches from me. There was Thomas More's resignation letter, and Thomas Wyatt's book, it was like a sensory overload, I couldn't quite believe that I was looking at Anne's handwriting. So much incredible history crammed into one space. I wanted everybody else to go away and leave me there on my own for a while.

For anyone interested, there is still some info on the British Library site at http://www.bl.uk/henry

June 9, 2010
10:49 pm
Avatar
Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 595
Member Since:
August 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I would totally be the same, Wendy! And I'd wouldn't want people with me who might be ready to move on long before I was. I'd be in goose-bumpy, history-geek heaven.

                        survivor ribbon                             

               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

June 10, 2010
6:54 am
Avatar
Claire
Admin
Forum Posts: 959
Member Since:
February 16, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I was lucky enough to go have a sneak peak at the reserve collection at the Mary Rose Museum the other week. It was incredible looking at all the everyday objects that had belonged to real Tudor sailors – tiny dice, combs, shoes, bits of clothing, games boards, bowls with initials shakily carved on them. It really blew my mind.

Also I've never felt closer to Anne than I did at Hever Castle at the tour. We were allowed to dine one night in the Castle dining room, which is roped off in the day time, and that was an amazing experience. I kept looking around and thinking about Anne eating there.

Debunking the myths about Anne Boleyn

June 10, 2010
11:12 am
Avatar
Bella44
New Zealand
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 933
Member Since:
January 9, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

One of these days I'll get to Hever Castle!!!!!!

But I've been lucky enough to have been to the UK a couple of times and the Tower of London always makes me a little emotional – that's where I first learnt about Anne!  So the second time I went there made me feel even more closer to her.

The same with Sudeley Castle, another of my favourite places.  Standing in the little nursery room that Katherine Parr had decked out for her baby made me a little choked up.

June 10, 2010
11:33 am
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Wendy:

I had really wanted to see the exhibition, but I only had a week during my trip in 2009, and as I had a friend with me who had never been to London, we never made it there due to the time factor. Cry I was there in 2000 — saw Essex's death warrant; a copy of the Magna Carta; had hoped to see Jane Grey's Greek Testament that she carried to the scaffold but it was out for restoration. But I know how you feel about standing THAT close to history and knowing these people held these items, even left their notes in the margins. Wow! (I've only seen copies of Henry's letters to AnneSmile. I'd have loved to have seen them in person).

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 10, 2010
11:41 am
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Claire said:

I was lucky enough to go have a sneak peak at the reserve collection at the Mary Rose Museum the other week. It was incredible looking at all the everyday objects that had belonged to real Tudor sailors – tiny dice, combs, shoes, bits of clothing, games boards, bowls with initials shakily carved on them. It really blew my mind.

Also I've never felt closer to Anne than I did at Hever Castle at the tour. We were allowed to dine one night in the Castle dining room, which is roped off in the day time, and that was an amazing experience. I kept looking around and thinking about Anne eating there.


Hi Claire — the way you felt at the Mary Rose Museum I felt when I was walking around Nelson's Victory. My friend even mentioned that you could still smell the gunpowder down below (my sinuses were clogged upFrown and I couldn't), so it wasn't too hard imagining the battle at Trafalgar!

I fell in love with Hever. Have only been there once (back in 2000), and it was a cool, rainy day. I walked from the rail station, stopped by the church where Sir Thomas is buried, then spent 4 hours at the castle, inside and out. I kept trying to imagine what it was like for her as a child, and then being sent away to France, then coming home again. You wonder about her dreams, her hopes, what she may have imagined for her future possibly when she was engaged to Henry Percy, and then later involved with Henry. Oooo…to get to dine there. Wow!

You know, I always forget that Anne of Cleves lived there, and I guess Elizabeth visited there too. You have to wonder what she must have thought, walking through the same gardens and halls that her mother once did.

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 10, 2010
2:03 pm
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I knew they had done a lot of restoration work on the Victory, but good grief! THAT's more than I realized! Thanks for the info — and my friend will be disappointed that we weren't smelling gunpowder left over from years ago. We had figured it was just trapped in the woodwork.

But how cool for you to have served on her this year! I got to go on her during the Bicentennial back in 2005; was even in Portsmouth, down near the waterfront when the Queen had dinner on-board and they unleashed a broadside. THAT was cool. And I've “drooled” over the Trafalgar Sail as well. (I love that the clips are from my favorite movie, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. I guess my second favorite period of English history, after those 'naughty' Tudors is the late Georgian/Regency period of Lord NelsonLaugh).

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 11, 2010
3:03 am
Avatar
Jenny
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 45
Member Since:
February 8, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

St. Paul's Cathedral!!!  What a wonderful building although from what I understand Charless II and Chrsitopher Wren had a number of detractors at the time.  I would love to get up to the Whispering gallery but I am a coward when it comes to heights – Last time I was there, though I was really tempted, but it was the thought of coming down the stairs that frightened me more (I had my left wrist in plaster at the time) and remembering when I once climbed the Tor at Glastonbury on a very windy day and almost did a “Mary Poppins” on my way down – Fortunately a very kind gentleman assisted in my passage.

Back to St. Paul's, did any of you know that the original St. Paul's was used as stables during the Civil War by theb Roundheads.  Another claim to fame is that only two Princes of Wales have been married in that Catherdal – Prince Arthur to Catherine of Aragon (6 months later he was dead) and Prince Charles to Diana (she lasted longer but unfortunately she also died)

June 11, 2010
10:53 am
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

wreckmasterjay said:just for an added bit….went to St Pauls Cathedral in London last week and saw Nelsons tomb. Its huge! Well worth a visit. Duke of Wellington is there too as well as Admiral Collingwood. I'm actuallly at HMS Collingwood at the mo doing a course. Its very boring here though 🙁


I love St. Paul's Cathedral! And I always make it a point to visit Nelson's tomb.

Good luck on the course — sorry to hear it's so boring Frown

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 11, 2010
10:59 am
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Jenny said:

St. Paul's Cathedral!!!  What a wonderful building although from what I understand Charless II and Chrsitopher Wren had a number of detractors at the time.  I would love to get up to the Whispering gallery but I am a coward when it comes to heights – Last time I was there, though I was really tempted, but it was the thought of coming down the stairs that frightened me more (I had my left wrist in plaster at the time) and remembering when I once climbed the Tor at Glastonbury on a very windy day and almost did a “Mary Poppins” on my way down – Fortunately a very kind gentleman assisted in my passage.

Back to St. Paul's, did any of you know that the original St. Paul's was used as stables during the Civil War by theb Roundheads.  Another claim to fame is that only two Princes of Wales have been married in that Catherdal – Prince Arthur to Catherine of Aragon (6 months later he was dead) and Prince Charles to Diana (she lasted longer but unfortunately she also died)


Hey Jenny — didn't know that about only two Princes of Wales being married there.

I made it up to the Whispering Gallery back in 2000, but the friend who was traveling with me at the time refused to try the experiment of seeing if you can hear another's voice if you're on the opposite side. This last time (2009), I had another friend with me and it was wonderful sharing the experience with a fellow Christian who could appreciate not only the magnificent architecture, but the spiritual side as well. (We both also paid our respects to Admiral Nelson since we're fans of his).

There's a spot near the gardens on one side of the cathedral where they have a drawing of the current church, as well as an outline of the original St. Paul's (prior to the Great Fire), which I guess would have been the one that saw Arthur and Catherine of Aragon's wedding…and I think Elizabeth may have held a celebration of thanksgiving for the Armada defeat there too. I think there's also a model of the old St. Paul's inside too. I can only imagine what it looked like as a beautiful medieval church, but the current one is awesome!Smile 

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 12, 2010
7:50 am
Avatar
Jenny
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 45
Member Since:
February 8, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Tina,

If you ever get to Worcester in England you must visit the medeavial cathedral which not only house the tomb of King John (buried between two saints to lift him to heaven) but Prince Arthur's hantry which was unfortunately somewhat descrated during the Civil war although the remains are there.  Worcester was also an extremely impotrant city during medeavial, Tudor and Stuart Times, because of its river and its location near the Welsh borders.   It also still has a street “Friar Street” which is almost completly full of the famous “black and white houses”.  For those who follow the civil war, Worcester was Royalist and the scene of various battles during the number of wars that took place in the 17th century.  It's motto, given by Charles II is “Civitas en bello et pace Fideles” “Citizens Faitheful in War and Peace” – Also set very near the beautiful area of the Cotswolds…… 

June 12, 2010
2:07 pm
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I've been to the Cotswolds (LOVED THEM!) but didn't make it to Worcester although I've read about it in the past. After reading your post, I'll have to keep it in mind for my next long trip. (I get to retire in about 3 years from my position of what is coming up now on 24 years! We can retire in 27 Laugh. Since we can only take 2 weeks annual vacation at a time, I was limited in 2009 and could only stay in England a week, compared to 2 weeks in 2005 and 3 in 2000. So I'll have to wait until retirement to celebrate with a much longer holiday!!!)

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 13, 2010
3:33 am
Avatar
Jenny
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 45
Member Since:
February 8, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Tina and to everyone,

Britain does have so much to offer in the sense of historical places and ambiences.  Worcester is also famous for the “lea and Perrins Sauce”, Edward Elgar, Witley Court (which is amazing) plus so many other things.  Apart from Worcester so many interesting places to visit such as Cornwall (where King  Arthur was supposed to have been born at Tintagel) and such a wonderful, peaceful county, Penzance in Deven where you have St. Michael's Mount (almost a mirror image of Mont St. Michel in France), Somerset where you have Glastonbury, it Cathedral which was destroyed by HVIII and Cromwell but the ruins are stiill there  and  it's Tor (supposedly Avalon and where Joseph of Aramathea planted the famous Thorn bush) – Also to drink the wter that is considered to be the sweat and blood of Christ – And not far away the beautiful tiny city of Wells which has one of Britain's smallest and most beautiful cathedrals set in grounds to die for.  Not far away is the famous Spa City of Bath, Salisbury and Stonehenge and it's amazing how all these places are linked.  Further north into Wales the Breecon area plus teh Sonowdonia area with it's magical island of Anglesey and going even further noth to York, the second city of England for many years – I could go on and on.   Anyone wanting any advice on where to go can always e mail me at Jennybrowntrave@telefonica. net.  This is not a business offer, it is because I love to talk about the country I was born in and share  its history with everyone 

June 13, 2010
12:38 pm
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi again Jenny (and everyone):

And of course you mention Wales! I think I mentioned it on another thread, but I fell in love with Wales when I read the book Crown in Candlelight about Owen Tudor and Katherine of Valois. I also remembered that Henry VII had — to strengthen his links to the English throne — attempted to show that he was descended from Uther Pendragon and therefore King Arthur. So Wales is on my list of places to visit. Like I mentioned in my original post, I stayed at Thornbury Castle and didn't realize how close I was to the border or I would have made arrangements to check things out!

Worcester — Lea and Perrins! LOVE Lea and Perrins!Laugh But when I have more time, when I can visit again in say 3 or 4 years, I'd like to see Glastonbury and Tintagil. Went to Stonehenge in 2000 on one of those day trips out of London, and found myself on Salisbury Plain in a driving rain storm. Everyone wanted to head back to the coach, but I said it had taken me my whole life to make it to England, and I wasn't going to let a little rain and wind stop me!! LOL (On that same trip we also went to Bath for the afternoon — AND IT SNOWED! In APRIL! So we had rain at Stonehenge, snow at Bath, and sunshine when we got back to London….Reminded me of home LOL).

I think it's wonderful that you love sharing your passion for your country with others. I've been such an Anglophile my whole life and have had such good-natured “arguments” with the very few Francophiles I've known. But it's been wonderful visiting those places I had read about or seen in pictures since I was a kid. I guess that's why I started this thread!

Oh! One more “close to you” experience which I forgot. When I went to Westminster Abbey, I was curious about the tomb of Katherine of Valois. I had read that at one time, it was in such poor condition, you could see her corpse, and diarist Samuel Pepys allegedly boasted that he had been able to reach in, take the body and fondle it so he could say he had embraced or made love to a queen. (And boy oh boy if that's true, that crosses into a WHOLE other realm). I asked one of the guides whether her tomb had been repaired; repeated the story (the guide seemed to believe it was accurate), and he said that yes, it had been repaired. I told him how fascinated I was with her and her connection to the Tudors, so he suggested I go to the Abbey library and ask for more information. He said that when I knocked (since it's not open to the public, or wasn't in 2000), let them know my reasons and they'd let me in. Sure enough they did. One of the librarians gave me a translation of a French biography on Katherine, and I spent the next couple of hours reading it. Yeah, here I am in London, in a library, when others are out touring about! LOL But hey, that's me.

But hey I'm weird. Smile When I was at St. George's Chapel, I asked a guide how many people had access to the area where Henry VIII is buried. The guide said only a select few including the Queen and the Prince of Wales. And I actually said, “Do you think they'd consider letting an American Anglophile who has been in love with the Tudors forever take a peek? With a supervised escort of course?” LOL The guide smiled, said she'd never even had a Brit ask that of her, and politely said she wished she could get me a way, but nah. Oh well — I figured it didn't hurt trying!

Sorry this is so long. The more I write the more I start remembering other things, but I'll save that for later!

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 14, 2010
4:13 am
Avatar
Jenny
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 45
Member Since:
February 8, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Tina,

I have found that in Britain, if you really show interest, guides will fall over backwards to show you a little something else ifthey can.  I remember being a Paxton House on the borders of Scotland which used to belong to the Kerr faimily, a family, because they were on the borders changed sides a number of times.  The guide asked us (there were two of us) if we felt there was something different about the place and I said that if the place had belonged to the kerr family I had already seen it.  The Kerr family were notoriously left-handed and so all their medeavial building were designed for lefted handed people including the widing staircases because they would have had their sword in their left hand instead of their right – Fascinating stuff.

And yes, the Katherine of Valois and Owen Tudor story is another fascinating piece.  When Katherine was married to HV he asked her specifically not to have her baby in Windsor castle because there had been a forecast that if his son was born there he would have a long and more or less boring live where his father would have a short but unforgettable reign (those are not the exact words) and in fact HV died when HVI was a child.  Owen Tudor was thought to be HV's master of the horse which is how he came to know Katherine of Valois.

Another piece of “historical” gossip reminded me of Robert the Bruce when a friend wrote and told me that Thomas Hadry the writer, had his heart cut out and his body buried in Westminster Abbey.  The heart was put in a biscuit tin to be interred at a later date in Dorset but when the time came, they found the tiin, next to a very happy cat, empty so the cat was killed and interred.  How true that was is I don't know.  But then it reminded me of Robert the Bruce who, for a time was excommuncated by the Pope and got his rights back by promising to go on a crusade.  Unfortunately, wars with England interferred and Robert was mortally injured.  On his deathbed, he made his friend  Douglas, promise to have his heart cut out so that his body, as a king could be interred at Dumferline but the heart was to be taken to the Holy land.  On the way to that place, Douglas and compatriots passed through Spain where they encountered and fought with Moors who mortally wounded Douglas who before his dying breath, threw the heart to a companiaion who raced back to Scotland where the Heart was interred at Melrose Abbey.  It had to be hidden very quickly as the English who were always at war with the Scots wanted their hands on it.  It was discovered again in the early 20th century, and then in 1996 sent to Edinburgh which caused a stink but in 1998 was buried once again with full honours at Melrose Abbey.  The borders of Scotland is also another extrmely interesting area for afficiondos of History.

June 14, 2010
7:49 am
Avatar
TinaII2None
Kentucky
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 393
Member Since:
June 5, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Jenny —

I wasn't familiar with Paxton House but now? LOL Wow.

I love the story of Owen Tudor and Katherine of Valois — it was almost a fairy tale story (the princess/Queen and the “commoner” — I know Owen was supposed to have had some aristocratic blood) but with such a bittersweet ending. I know that neither of them could imagine what their love would end up producing, which is likely why I found their story so incredible.

You are definitely right about the tour guides. I think most of them were floored with me being American and asking some of the questions that I did. I got into some great conversations with guides at Windsor Castle, Leeds Castle, Warwick Castle, Sudeley Castle and Hatfield House. At Warwick, a guide let me snap a couple of quick pictures of a pair of beautiful green gloves that belonged to Elizabeth (I was stunned by how long those fingers were! I mean, I had heard she had those long, tapered fingers she was so proud of, but to see the gloves she wore — fantastic!). At Sudeley, when we were in one of the family rooms, I told one of the guides that the current lady of the house shared my home state of Kentucky, a fact which made him smile (that's a whole other story too about my fellow Kentuckian). He pointed out a wedding photo of Her Ladyship's son and a very lovely young woman, then informed me that the young man (this was in 2000) had recently married a Hawaiian. The guide chuckled and added, “We love your American stock. You're still so young. Good to have one of you in the bloodline!” I just laughed back.

And then came Hatfield. That was during my “Tudor Pilgrimmage” of 2000 and it was my last day in England. On Saturday I'd spent a partially rainy day at Anne's Hever, and now on Sunday I was visiting the “home” of her daughter. I'd walked out onto the main grounds, found the replacement tree, then sat under it trying to imagine when the actual tree stood there and wondering if I could will myself into some dimension and witness those moments when Elizabeth learned she was queen. (My baby sister was born on that day — November 17th). Smile Okay I know the house there now isn't the original (I did get to peep into the original Great Hall), but it was a chance to see one of Elizabeth's portraits — I think the Rainbow Portrait (one of my favorites), then head into one area where her letter to Mary was on display. I believe it was the first time it had been put on public display, but in 2000, it was I believe the Millennium year so the whole country had a load of things on display or you were given access to many locations that had previously been blocked. So I'm analyzing the letter, remembering the background of the story, reading every word and admiring Elizabeth's courage in writing it, and a guide and I started talking and she saw that I knew Elizabeth quite well….Which is probably why she looked around and seeing we were alone, asked if I wanted to take a picture of the Great Hall from where we were (it was a GREAT view). I said “Are you kidding?” She said “No, no, go ahead.” So I got near one of the windows and snapped off a few. Laugh *sigh* THAT was sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeet!

Worst experience: with one exception (I won't lump all of them into the same category because I hope this isn't always the case) the Beefeaters at the Tower were not only rude but condescending. If you spoke with some variation of an American accent or an Australian accent, everything was dumbed down and they behaved as though they were talking to a child or someone mentally handicapped. I know they get a load of stupid questions, but if someone asks a good one, they shouldn't be put down simply because they're not English. The Beefeater that led our group was giving some commentary, and I leaned over to my friend at the time to whisper that there was actually more to it or that his facts might have been off. He caught me whispering to her and called me out, and asked me to say out loud what I was talking about. That made me angry anyway (for all he knew I was asking her where she wanted to go for lunch), but I repeated it and he proceeded in telling me that of course an American would get it wrong. Which didn't go over well with the Americans in the group from the way they mumbled, and didn't go over with some of the Aussies either! (Bless 'em). It didn't help afterwards when another one got rude when — in one of the towers — I asked about a wall inscription allegedly made by Robert Dudley. Or (going back to that first Beefeater) he seemed surprised that we all wanted to see where the three Queens were buried.

I'm glad the happier times have outweighed the poor experiences, and I've rambled long enough…again! LOL

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 15, 2010
8:06 am
Avatar
Jenny
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 45
Member Since:
February 8, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Tina,

Your comment about the Beefeaters in the Tower makes me very sad because when I was last there a few years back they couldn't have been nicer and more helpful and I met so many other “actors” dressed in various costumes and could have spent the whiole day there and still have missed a lot.  However I had a very short 3 hours but managed also to see the crown jewels.  I am sure that you are aware the the Imperial Crown of India was last worn by the present Queen's father as he was the last Emperor of India.  This crown was made for a visit, I think of George V to India as he couldn't take the English crown jewels out of te country.

Don't know whether you have got to Edinburgh Castle but their Crown Jewels are also amazing, known as the “Hononours of Scotland” and which were hidden for many years after the rebellion of the Scots against the English and the present Queen has to get permission from the Scots to be able to wear them. 

Scotland has a dirth of Castles, basically divided into Fortess Types or Chateau's but I think the ones on the borders, many of whioch are partly ruined are more interesting – but that's a personal angle. 

From what I can see you'll be taking a year out to visit everything you want in Britain. 

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 214

Currently Online:
10 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Anyanka: 2337

Boleyn: 2285

Sharon: 2115

Bella44: 933

DuchessofBrittany: 846

Mya Elise: 781

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 425948

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 13

Topics: 1683

Posts: 23040

Newest Members:

qvist been, Barmans, baba elvis, doctormorris, jameejendnd, snowline

Administrators: Claire: 959