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Could someone help with me British slang?
March 31, 2011
6:38 pm
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Impish_Impulse
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Anyanka said:

Sharon said:


I love to hear a man with a Scots brogue.  Sends shivers up and down my spine.  Wink

 


Ash slong ash it's not Shean Connery. Hish voiche drives me up the wall….


I agree with Sharon. And LOL, Anyanka! Have you ever heard Craig Ferguson (a Scot) “do” Sean Connery? He sounds just like your example.

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April 1, 2011
4:55 am
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Nasim
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Louise said:

Accents are sexy,

 

Not West Country accents! Bristolian in particular is not exactly soft on the ears (incidentally Being Human used to be filmed in Bristol). Thankfully I never adopted the accent of my region!

 

(For those who don't know what the West Country accent sounds like – think Hagrid (Harry Potter). I read somewhere that J.K. Rowling, who grew up near where I live, honoured her roots by giving Hagrid this accent. Not sure if that is true or not…) 

 

Sir Walter Raleigh apparently had a West Country accent (Devonshire to be more precise), which stood out at the Elizabethan court. How he managed to woo many ladies with that accent, I will never know!

"Much as her form seduc'd the sight,
Her eyes could ev'n more surely woo;"

April 1, 2011
6:12 am
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Louise
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Ha!! My partners got a slight West Country accent, so I'll tell him what you said. I like it. OK, it's not exactly sexy, in fact it puts you to sleep, but I still like it, especially when I'm suffering from insomnia.

April 1, 2011
6:23 am
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DuchessofBrittany
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Nasim said:

 

Not West Country accents! Bristolian in particular is not exactly soft on the ears (incidentally Being Human used to be filmed in Bristol). Thankfully I never adopted the accent of my region!


If you visit western Prince Edward Island, a version of a west country accent is alive and well. The majority of people who live there are descendents of west country migrants. My maternal grandparents come from “up west,” and they have a particular accent.

"By daily proof you shall find me to be to you both loving and kind" Anne Boleyn

April 1, 2011
2:09 pm
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Nasim
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Louise said:

Ha!! My partners got a slight West Country accent, so I'll tell him what you said. I like it.


 

*Runs and hides* Sorry!Embarassed

 

If it helps, my mum and many of her relatives have the accent. I come from a very long line of West Country speakers (got as far back as c.1515 and my family were still in Somerset and Gloucestershire.) There are various regional phrases that are endearing (like ‘gurt lush’), but the emphasis on the 'r's is annoying! Got to love the parody of the accent on Little Britain!

 

The best accent in the British Isles is Welsh. Lived in Wales for three years and never got bored of it!

"Much as her form seduc'd the sight,
Her eyes could ev'n more surely woo;"

April 2, 2011
1:07 am
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Claire
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I love accents and dialects! When I moved to Gloucestershire I had to keep a straight face when a friend of mine said that she “led down” instead of “lay down” and that she was “frit” instead of “frightened”. Does anyone in the UK watch “The Boat that Guy Built”? My kids love Guy's accent (Lincolnshire) and go round the house saying “by heck, chief” all the time!

There are various times when I've been reading a Patricia Cornwell thriller and I've had to look online for an American phrase or word, I love that there is so much variation in the English language, and don't get me started on my friend's text messages, text speak is a mystery to me! LOL ROFL!

By the way, I'm not sure what accent I have. My parents are from Cheshire and North Wales, I was born in Lancashire but grew up in Warwickshire, have lived in Warwickshire, Coventry, Sussex, Oxfordshire, Gloucestershire and Spain! A bit of a mixture!

Debunking the myths about Anne Boleyn

April 2, 2011
8:30 am
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Sharon
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Nasim said:

Louise said:

Ha!! My partners got a slight West Country accent, so I'll tell him what you said. I like it.


 

*Runs and hides* Sorry!Embarassed

 

If it helps, my mum and many of her relatives have the accent. I come from a very long line of West Country speakers (got as far back as c.1515 and my family were still in Somerset and Gloucestershire.) There are various regional phrases that are endearing (like ‘gurt lush’), but the emphasis on the 'r's is annoying! Got to love the parody of the accent on Little Britain!

 

The best accent in the British Isles is Welsh. Lived in Wales for three years and never got bored of it!


And 'gurt lush' means?

April 2, 2011
5:49 pm
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MegC
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@ Claire:  Patricia Cornwell did a lot of her research for her books at the University of Tennessee Body Farm which was probably 5 miles from my house growing up.  It's not exactly hidden–everyone in south Knoxville knew where it was, but few people were brave enough to try to scale the fence with razor wire around the top to get in and hang out with dead bodies.  Besides, UT prosecutes people pretty heavily who are caught traipsing through the Body Farm without permission.

While we certainly have our variety of accents, I don't know if they're as obviously distinguishable as the various British accents.

@Sharon:  She drew toast?  Oh, god love her heart.  Maybe she wasn't the one who couldn't read…maybe it was the cook?  Still…wow.  

Btw, “god love her heart” probably a distinctly Southern phrase, along with “bless her heart”, which, having been said, will automatically lessen the impact of any negative comment made after it.  For example, “Bless her heart, she's just not that pretty”.

"We mustn't let our passions destroy our dreams…"

April 2, 2011
5:55 pm
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Anyanka
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Sharon said:

Nasim said:

Louise said:

Ha!! My partners got a slight West Country accent, so I'll tell him what you said. I like it.


 

*Runs and hides* Sorry!Embarassed

 

If it helps, my mum and many of her relatives have the accent. I come from a very long line of West Country speakers (got as far back as c.1515 and my family were still in Somerset and Gloucestershire.) There are various regional phrases that are endearing (like ‘gurt lush’), but the emphasis on the 'r's is annoying! Got to love the parody of the accent on Little Britain!

 

The best accent in the British Isles is Welsh. Lived in Wales for three years and never got bored of it!


And 'gurt lush' means?
 


I know “lush” as drinking or as a noun..she's a lush. So I'm guessing it means ” getting drunk”

It's always bunnies.

April 2, 2011
5:59 pm
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Anyanka
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MegC said:

@ Claire:  Patricia Cornwell did a lot of her research for her books at the University of Tennessee Body Farm which was probably 5 miles from my house growing up.  It's not exactly hidden–everyone in south Knoxville knew where it was, but few people were brave enough to try to scale the fence with razor wire around the top to get in and hang out with dead bodies.  Besides, UT prosecutes people pretty heavily who are caught traipsing through the Body Farm without permission.

While we certainly have our variety of accents, I don't know if they're as obviously distinguishable as the various British accents.

@Sharon:  She drew toast?  Oh, god love her heart.  Maybe she wasn't the one who couldn't read…maybe it was the cook?  Still…wow.  

Btw, “god love her heart” probably a distinctly Southern phrase, along with “bless her heart”, which, having been said, will automatically lessen the impact of any negative comment made after it.  For example, “Bless her heart, she's just not that pretty”.


I've been in Canada for 11 years, I'm starting to get a handle on a lot of the North American accents.

 

Though I do find people from British Coloumbia esp Vancouver have an accent closer to Australian than American..

It's always bunnies.

April 3, 2011
9:16 am
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Nasim
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Sharon said:

Nasim said:

Louise said:

Ha!! My partners got a slight West Country accent, so I'll tell him what you said. I like it.


 

*Runs and hides* Sorry!Embarassed

 

If it helps, my mum and many of her relatives have the accent. I come from a very long line of West Country speakers (got as far back as c.1515 and my family were still in Somerset and Gloucestershire.) There are various regional phrases that are endearing (like ‘gurt lush’), but the emphasis on the 'r's is annoying! Got to love the parody of the accent on Little Britain!

 

The best accent in the British Isles is Welsh. Lived in Wales for three years and never got bored of it!


And 'gurt lush' means?


 

Gurt lush = very nice, e.g. “That chocolate cake is gurt lush!”

"Much as her form seduc'd the sight,
Her eyes could ev'n more surely woo;"

April 3, 2011
9:57 pm
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Bella44
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Gurt lush!!! Never heard that one before, LOL

You really do have to feel sorry for people trying to learn English as a second language – sometimes its bad enough having it as your first language Laugh Laugh Laugh

April 4, 2011
9:46 am
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Sharon
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MegC said:

 

Btw, “god love her heart” probably a distinctly Southern phrase, along with “bless her heart”, which, having been said, will automatically lessen the impact of any negative comment made after it.  For example, “Bless her heart, she's just not that pretty”.


“god love her heart,” is a new one for me, and very sweet, but…”Bless her heart,”….is said here quite a bit…lol.  
I have some friends in VA and they say, “Makes ya wanna slap your grandma.”  Usually after talking about something that was being eaten and was being much appreciated.  Doesn't sound like a compliment, I know.

I think it was Patricia Cromwell who wrote a book on Jack.  It was written by an author who writes murder mystery novels.  According to the author, her investigation closed the book on the case.  I did not read it.

April 4, 2011
10:02 am
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MegC
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@Sharon…yeah, I think that was Patricia Cornwell.  And, for some reason, I think I read it.  But it was so long ago and left so little of an impact on me, that I have completely forgotten what conclusions she came to.

Better that she stick with crime fiction, imo.

"We mustn't let our passions destroy our dreams…"

April 5, 2011
12:00 pm
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Louise
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Anyanka said:

Upon-Tyne or Under-Lime?? 


Sorry, I just saw this. Newcastle-upon-Tyne (why-aye pet) 

April 5, 2011
1:27 pm
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Anyanka
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Louise said:

Anyanka said:

Upon-Tyne or Under-Lime?? 


Sorry, I just saw this. Newcastle-upon-Tyne (why-aye pet) 


Hadday and sh!te hinny man. I was just yanking your chain.  I'm a Monkey-hanger by birth…

 

Thou shalt have a fishie when the boot comes in!

It's always bunnies.

April 5, 2011
1:44 pm
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Louise
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Anyanka said:


Hadday and sh!te hinny man. I was just yanking your chain.  I'm a Monkey-hanger by birth…
 

Thou shalt have a fishie when the boot comes in!


Oh, Dear Lord! I get the “when the boot comes in” and I get “yanking your chain”. I guess, “monkey-hanger” means Geordie, but I've never heard it before, and the first bit's a mystery. 

April 5, 2011
2:52 pm
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Anyanka
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Louise said:

Anyanka said:


Hadday and sh!te hinny man. I was just yanking your chain.  I'm a Monkey-hanger by birth…

 

Thou shalt have a fishie when the boot comes in!


Oh, Dear Lord! I get the “when the boot comes in” and I get “yanking your chain”. I guess, “monkey-hanger” means Geordie, but I've never heard it before, and the first bit's a mystery.
 


The first bit is a earthy but friendly  term for ” Be off with you” or “You've got to be joking” 

Monkey-Hanger refers to a North- Eastern  English sea-side town who are supposed to have hung a monkey which was washed ashore in French naval clothing during the Napoleonic wars. Sincde it didn't seek English , it was hung as a spy.

 

When the boot comes in is a folk song from Northumberland http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W…..%28song%29

It's always bunnies.

April 5, 2011
7:48 pm
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Impish_Impulse
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MegC said:

@Sharon…yeah, I think that was Patricia Cornwell.  And, for some reason, I think I read it.  But it was so long ago and left so little of an impact on me, that I have completely forgotten what conclusions she came to.

Better that she stick with crime fiction, imo.


I read it, too. She thought Jack the Ripper was some obscure artist (forget his name) with mental issues who spent much of his life in France. I remember one of her bits of 'proof' was that he was prone to depicting violence against women in his artwork, and that one of his works resembled one of the crime scene photos (the last murder, canonically, and the grisliest).

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April 11, 2011
5:50 am
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MegC
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Not slang so much, but how much is a stone?

"We mustn't let our passions destroy our dreams…"

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