Could someone help with me British slang? | Page 3 | Off Topic Chit-Chat | Forum

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Could someone help with me British slang?
April 11, 2011
6:14 am
Avatar
Bill1978
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 476
Member Since:
April 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

1 stone = 14 pounds

 

which means that in kilograms

 

1 stone = 6.4 kilograms

April 11, 2011
6:18 pm
Avatar
Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 595
Member Since:
August 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Sharon said:

MegC said:

 

Btw, “god love her heart” probably a distinctly Southern phrase, along with “bless her heart”, which, having been said, will automatically lessen the impact of any negative comment made after it.  For example, “Bless her heart, she's just not that pretty”.


“god love her heart,” is a new one for me, and very sweet, but…”Bless her heart,”….is said here quite a bit…lol.  


And here I thought “Bless her heart” said in a certain tone of voice was a genteel, Southern way of saying, “She's an idiot!” There's a lady at work who says, “Bless her pointed little head” in this syrupy sweet tone of voice. And then gives you this innocent face, daring you to take offense. I usually start laughing about then…

                        survivor ribbon                             

               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

April 11, 2011
7:39 pm
Avatar
MegC
Georgia, US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 426
Member Since:
October 31, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Impish_Impulse said:

Sharon said:

MegC said:

 

Btw, “god love her heart” probably a distinctly Southern phrase, along with “bless her heart”, which, having been said, will automatically lessen the impact of any negative comment made after it.  For example, “Bless her heart, she's just not that pretty”.


“god love her heart,” is a new one for me, and very sweet, but…”Bless her heart,”….is said here quite a bit…lol.
 


And here I thought “Bless her heart” said in a certain tone of voice was a genteel, Southern way of saying, “She's an idiot!” There's a lady at work who says, “Bless her pointed little head” in this syrupy sweet tone of voice. And then gives you this innocent face, daring you to take offense. I usually start laughing about then…


Indeed, you are right!  “Bless her heart” said by itself is taken to mean, “He/she is not the brightest crayon in the box” (usually, though sometimes it can be used to denote sympathy.  It's all in context, really).  Though, if followed by something that is clearly an insult, it is meant to soften the effect of the comment, indicating that the person really has no control over it.

"We mustn't let our passions destroy our dreams…"

November 17, 2012
8:46 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Okay a question about the word “Bloody.” We were watching The Guns of Navarone the other day and there was a narrative after the movie talking about the actors and the filming of the movie. In the movie Richard Harris says, “Bloody Bloody Bloody.” The narrator said that was changed to “Ruddy Ruddy Ruddy” for the English version of the movie. The reason given was that Bloody is a profanity to rural English.
Why and what does it mean that makes it profane?

November 17, 2012
9:03 pm
Avatar
Louise
Hampshire, England
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 611
Member Since:
December 5, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think, and this may well be wrong, that bloody is blasphemous because it refers to the blood of Christ on the cross. So ruddy instead of bloody makes it just a word instead of a profanity, Kind of like saying sugar instead of shit.

November 18, 2012
12:37 am
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

My father was a pure breed Cockney Basically that means that people born within the sound of the Bow bells are considered as true Cockney. We also have the old pearly Kings and Queens, they are just people who I believe are sort of elected every year to dress up in a coat/Jacket and trousers which are completely covered in pearl buttons. Generely when Cockney rhyming sland is spoken it usually just one word, such as where Louise mentions a Ruby Murray it’s generally just said as going for a Ruby. Frog and Toad (Road) is usually just Frog,. Apples and Pears just Apples.
Whistle and Flute (suit) is just Whistle. Cockney slang isn’t used that often now but I think in one or 2 market Places it is..
I live in Kent and the dialect down here is a real mix You have those that were born east side of the Medway people are know as men of Kent on the west side of the Medway they are knew as Kentish men and the dialects are very different.
Just as Worcestershire and Herefordshire have different dialects. I was born in Sussex Brighton being very close to where I was actually born but moved to Malvern in Worcestershire when I was 4 however my accent is like someone from Devon, and yet I’ve never ever been to Devon however both my eldest kids have got a strong Worcestershire accent.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

November 18, 2012
12:53 am
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

In Worcestershire Stairs are referred to as Dancers don’t ask me why, in much the same way if you call someone and Idiot in Worcestershire it’s yudyut every area has it’s own slang sayings. I can tell you though it come in handy sometimes to have your own slang language, because when Dinosaur gets up my Bugle (another way of saying on your nerves) I can rant and rave at him in worcestershire slang and he hasn’t got a clue what I’m saying, so he doesn’t know how to answer back.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

November 18, 2012
4:43 am
Avatar
Anyanka
La Belle Province
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2337
Member Since:
November 18, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

My Brummie hubby who lived 22 miles away from Worcestershire..has never heard of this and his brother who is a Wossy import has never heard of this…
and D’Hoffryn’s Worcerster rellies have no idea what you’re on about…

It's always bunnies.

November 18, 2012
4:55 am
Avatar
Anyanka
La Belle Province
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2337
Member Since:
November 18, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Boleyn said

My father was a pure breed Cockney
Basically that means that people born within the sound of the Bow bells are considered as true Cockney

so was mine..

Louise mentions a Ruby Murray it’s generally just said as going for a Ruby. Frog and Toad (Road) is usually just Frog,. Apples and Pears just Apples.
Whistle and Flute (suit) is just Whistle. Cockney slang isn’t used that often now but I think in one or 2 market Places it is..

A lot of Cockney is now responding to popular culture..the whole cant is losing it’s appeal.From talking to me ole China”s it’s now getting into Mockney..

I live in Kent and the dialect down here is a real mix You have those that were born east side of the Medway people are know as men of Kent on the west side of the Medway they are knew as Kentish men and the dialects are very different.
Just as Worcestershire and Herefordshire have different dialects. I was born in Sussex Brighton being very close to where I was actually born but moved to Malvern in Worcestershire when I was 4 however my accent is like someone from Devon, and yet I’ve never ever been to Devon however both my eldest kids have got a strong Worcestershire accent.

I had work mates who lived within 12 miles of each other had had totally different Southern accents. My accent is different from my cousin who was born less than 10 miles away from me.

D’Hoffryn reports the same in his family dynamics.

DD1 has a more Britsh accent thatn DD2 or DS when she speaks English and yet all 3 of them have a more Quebecois French accent than I do..it’s words I learnt over here that I have no acent with. The European french I learnt at school has a distint accent in Quebec..

It's always bunnies.

November 18, 2012
12:25 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Anyanka said

My Brummie hubby who lived 22 miles away from Worcestershire..has never heard of this and his brother who is a Wossy import has never heard of this…
and D’Hoffryn’s Worcerster rellies have no idea what you’re on about…

Where I actually lived in Malvern was very rural and it could be that my “Slang” is indicative to just that area, I take as being part and package of the whole area as it’s understood by those who don’t neccassarly use this “slang” in their everyday speech. Dinosaur says that some of the “slang” I speak is very Brummie like so again this is a prime example where you have a whole lot of different cultures and dialects living in different places other then in their own cities or towns and over time dialects get mixed up, and get changed, adopted and excepted as the normal speech of that area.

Yes you are right about the rhyming slang changing to fit the modern world, the rhyming slang my dad taught me is very different to what you hear today. In short it has become bastadized and has lost a lot of it’s charm and novel quality. The only place you can really hear the true rhyming slang that we knew as kids is really now from the elderly members of East end of London and especially around the the Bow bells area.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

November 18, 2012
1:55 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Here’s a really obscure “Slang” term for you all to try and figure out.
“On the earhole”
and a few other rhyming “slang” terms too
Olivered? (Modern Slang)
Brahms?
Jimmy?
J Arthur?
Ginger?
Iron?
Doily?
Grumble? (Modern slang)
Minces?
Plates?
Browned?
Loaf?
That should fox a few minds?

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

November 18, 2012
3:17 pm
Avatar
Neil Kemp
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 447
Member Since:
April 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Anyanka’s right about a lot of “Mockney” doing the rounds now. Middle-class types with money coming out of their ears trying to make out that they’re the voice of the people. Personally I think it’s a load of pony.Wink

November 18, 2012
3:35 pm
Avatar
Neil Kemp
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 447
Member Since:
April 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Boleyn, as far as I know, plenty of people in this country are now on the ear’ole, whilst your’e bound to need a Jimmy after getting Brahms. I think I’ll just close my minces now and give my plates a rest. As for Ginger, I’m not going there.Wink

November 18, 2012
3:41 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Neil Kemp said

Boleyn, as far as I know, plenty of people in this country are now on the ear’ole, whilst your’e bound to need a Jimmy after getting Brahms. I think I’ll just close my minces now and give my plates a rest. As for Ginger, I’m not going there.Wink

LOL Neil you really are a card, but I love you for it.
Yep quite right the amount of people “on the ear’ole” really does get my goat, as for those who pretenders to the Cockney Slang they can kiss my ‘arris or less common “slang” term bottle.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

November 18, 2012
5:22 pm
Avatar
Bella44
New Zealand
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 933
Member Since:
January 9, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I’m completely confused…. Laugh

November 18, 2012
7:24 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Bella44 said

I’m completely confused…. Laugh

LOL here’s a few more for you to get even more confused.
Boat?
Chatting gear.
Have your trousers taken down, or had by the short and curlies?
Bobbies?
Bent as a nine bob note
2 bob bits.
Every area in the world has their euphemisums for different words.
For instance a Dollar in America is often reffered to as a greenback or a buck, our Pound is called a quid
A pony is £25
A Monkey is £500

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

November 18, 2012
8:31 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Bella44 said

I’m completely confused…. Laugh

Me too Bella.
Thanks Louise.
The rest of you…I have no idea what any of you are saying. Speak English! Surprised Wink

November 20, 2012
12:43 pm
Avatar
Gill
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 118
Member Since:
June 15, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Boleyn said

In Worcestershire Stairs are referred to as Dancers don’t ask me why, in much the same way if you call someone and Idiot in Worcestershire it’s yudyut every area has it’s own slang sayings. I can tell you though it come in handy sometimes to have your own slang language, because when Dinosaur gets up my Bugle (another way of saying on your nerves) I can rant and rave at him in worcestershire slang and he hasn’t got a clue what I’m saying, so he doesn’t know how to answer back.

My dad is from Walsall and round there they call them dancers too, as in ‘get up them dancers’. So it’s not just Worcestershire. I have a sneaking suspicion it might have originated from a kind of rhyming slang – dancing bears perhaps?

While we’re on the subject of funny slang, my mum, who’s from Yorkshire, always says “well I’ll go t’foot of our stairs’ to express astonishment. Seriously, what the hell…? LOL I could never figure out why anyone would go to the stair foot after being astonished!

November 20, 2012
2:43 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Sharon said

Bella44 said

I’m completely confused…. Laugh

Me too Bella.
Thanks Louise.
The rest of you…I have no idea what any of you are saying. Speak English! Surprised Wink

Ok Sharon just for you I’ll put you out of your misery for what I put in…

Olivered = Oliver Twist = Pissed
Brahms = Brahms and Lizst = Pissed
Jimmy = Jimmy Riddle = Piddle
J Arthur = J Arthur Rank = Something an onanist does.
Ginger = Ginger Beer = Queer
Iron = Iron Hoof = Poof
Doily = Doily Cart = Fart
Grumble = Grumble and Grunt = The C word.
Minces =Mince Pies = Eyes
Plates =Plates of Meat = Feet
Browned = Brown Bread = Dead
Loaf = Loaf of Bread = Head.

Boat = Boat Race = Face
Chatting gear = A euphemisum for your mouth, as in when given a drink ” Get your chatting gear around that”
Have your trousers taken down, or had by the short and curlies = A Euphormisum for being short changed or ripped off.
Bobbies = A euphemisum for police men also know as Peelers, since Robert Peel was the one who started the idea of a Police force, both are exceptable to describe them. However there are a few variations such as Rozzers, Filth and Plod.
Bent as a nine bob note = Another term for a Ginger Beer.
2 bob bits = Diahorea.. The Runs.
And the one I mentioned to Neil: “arris = Harris stottle = Bottle and Glass = Arse.
Gill:
My mum used that saying too when she got flustered.. another one of her favourites “Oh blow and set fire to it, and when she was really cross quite apart from throwing her slippers across the room, she used to say Stuff my old boots.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

November 20, 2012
6:08 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

MegC said

Impish_Impulse said:

Sharon said:

MegC said:

 

Btw, “god love her heart” probably a distinctly Southern phrase, along with “bless her heart”, which, having been said, will automatically lessen the impact of any negative comment made after it.  For example, “Bless her heart, she’s just not that pretty”.


“god love her heart,” is a new one for me, and very sweet, but…”Bless her heart,”….is said here quite a bit…lol.
 


And here I thought “Bless her heart” said in a certain tone of voice was a genteel, Southern way of saying, “She’s an idiot!” There’s a lady at work who says, “Bless her pointed little head” in this syrupy sweet tone of voice. And then gives you this innocent face, daring you to take offense. I usually start laughing about then…


Indeed, you are right!  “Bless her heart” said by itself is taken to mean, “He/she is not the brightest crayon in the box” (usually, though sometimes it can be used to denote sympathy.  It’s all in context, really).  Though, if followed by something that is clearly an insult, it is meant to soften the effect of the comment, indicating that the person really has no control over it.

A slight deviation to that saying is He/she is not the sharpest knife in the drawer.
There are many sayings to denote a stupid person such as: All the lights are on but no-one is at home, A sandwich short of a picnic. A few bricks missing from his/her building. His/her Elevator doesn’t quite make the top floor, or an older one which is still used every so often is tuppence short of a shilling.

I forgot the “On the Ear’ole definition in my last post it means asking for things usually money.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 214

Currently Online:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Anyanka: 2337

Boleyn: 2285

Sharon: 2115

Bella44: 933

DuchessofBrittany: 846

Mya Elise: 781

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 427746

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 13

Topics: 1713

Posts: 23079

Newest Members:

albakl4, Michaelfen, RamonTuP, LonnieMef, FSUimance, Lefferttault

Administrators: Claire: 959