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Medieval pet names
June 25, 2013
12:50 am
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Anyanka
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http://earlymodernengland.com/…..pet-names/

People in the Middle Ages did keep pets – dogs, cats, birds, monkeys and many other kinds of animals. Although they often had particular duties – i.e. hunting or catching rats – there are many accounts that showed affection and love between these pets and their owners.

Scattered in various texts and remains from the Middle Ages, one can find that people gave names to their pets.

In England we find dogs that were named Sturdy, Whitefoot, Hardy, Jakke, Bo and Terri. Anne Boleyn, one of the wives of King Henry VIII, had a dog named Purkoy, who got its name from the French ‘pourquoi’ because it was very inquisitive.

Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Nun’s Priest Tale has a line where they name three dogs: Colle, Talbot and Gerland. Meanwhile, in the early fifteenth-century, Edward, Duke of York, wrote The Master of Game, which explains how dogs are to be used in hunting and taken care of. He also included a list of 1100 names that he thought would be appropriate for hunting dogs. They include Troy, Nosewise, Amiable, Nameles, Clenche, Bragge, Ringwood and Holdfast.

It's always bunnies.

June 25, 2013
1:33 am
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Anyanka
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here’s a picture opf a 15th c brass with the lady’s dog named but not the lady..

http://www.britainexpress.com/…..oto-10.htm

It's always bunnies.

June 25, 2013
6:56 am
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Boleyn
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Anne also had a Irish wolf hound I believe, called Urian.
Prince LLeyelln of Wales had a dog called Gellert. There is a legend connected with this dog.
“In the 13th century Llewelyn, prince of North Wales, had a palace at Beddgelert. One day he went hunting without Gelert, “The Faithful Hound”, who was unaccountably absent.

On Llewelyn’s return the truant, stained and smeared with blood, joyfully sprang to meet his master. The prince alarmed hastened to find his son, and saw the infant’s cot empty, the bedclothes and floor covered with blood.

The frantic father plunged his sword into the hound’s side, thinking it had killed his heir. The dog’s dying yell was answered by a child’s cry.

Llewelyn searched and discovered his boy unharmed, but near by lay the body of a mighty wolf which Gelert had slain.

The prince filled with remorse is said never to have smiled again.”
It’s a beautiful place to visit, very isolated but it has some of the most beautiful and breathtaking scenery. If I had the money that’s where I would retire to.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

June 25, 2013
1:44 pm
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Louise
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Oh dear! When I first read the title of this thread I immediately thought of ‘pet names’ and not ‘names for pets’ Sorry sweetiepie!

April 6, 2015
11:57 pm
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Alexandria
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Anyanka said

http://earlymodernengland.com/…..pet-names/

People in the Middle Ages did keep pets – dogs, cats, birds, monkeys and many other kinds of animals. Although they often had particular duties – i.e. hunting or catching rats – there are many accounts that showed affection and love between these pets and their owners.

Scattered in various texts and remains from the Middle Ages, one can find that people gave names to their pets.

In England we find dogs that were named Sturdy, Whitefoot, Hardy, Jakke, Bo and Terri. Anne Boleyn, one of the wives of King Henry VIII, had a dog named Purkoy, who got its name from the French ‘pourquoi’ because it was very inquisitive.

Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Nun’s Priest Tale has a line where they name three dogs: Colle, Talbot and Gerland. Meanwhile, in the early fifteenth-century, Edward, Duke of York, wrote The Master of Game, which explains how dogs are to be used in hunting and taken care of. He also included a list of 1100 names that he thought would be appropriate for hunting dogs. They include Troy, Nosewise, Amiable, Nameles, Clenche, Bragge, Ringwood and Holdfast.

Not sure about Gerland, but Colle and Talbot are breeds of dogs, not names for dogs. Colle is Collie, a sheepdog (although they would not have looked like modern collies), and a talbot was an old breed of hunting dog, now extinct but looking something like a foxhound, only bigger. They were the badge of the family of the Earls of Shrewsbury, whose surname was Talbot.
We know what some ancient Egyptians called their dogs – in heiroglyphic inscriptions we find Faithful, Black One, Sweetie, Barker. The only cats name we have is Lady.

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