True Tudor Clothes. | The Tudors Show | Forum

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
True Tudor Clothes.
August 17, 2011
7:34 pm
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 782
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Okay i've heard many people say that most of the dresses and outfits on The Tudors (and other shows or movies) are inaccurate. I just wanna ask if they made another movie or show, what would be the proper clothing attire? Because frankly, i don't know.

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

August 17, 2011
8:09 pm
Avatar
Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 599
Member Since:
August 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Arms were covered; no sleeveless dresses or tops, so those “ballerina” outfits in the pageant where Anne first speaks to Henry, were very inaccurate.

Hair was covered for both sexes. Hoods, caps, coifs, etc. So all the people with bare heads were inaccurate.

Those were some of the basic things they portrayed wrongly (on purpose – they thought it would look less sexy to modern eyes).

                        survivor ribbon                             

               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

August 17, 2011
8:21 pm
Avatar
Anyanka
La Belle Province
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2345
Member Since:
November 18, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

IIRC, virgins and queens* could have unbound hair. Married women had to cover their hair.

Un married women were allowed to have thier hair falling free which was one of the things trhat Anne was noted for. THe length of her hair and the fact she draped jewels in it. KoA allowed her to wear her French hoods which displayed Anne's hair.

 

*Queens for their coronation procession and when they wore thier crowns.

It's always bunnies.

March 11, 2012
11:56 am
Avatar
Sophie1536
Lincolnshire UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 305
Member Since:
January 17, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I thought Mary Tudor’s clothes were really lovely in the series Smile
I loved all the clothes inaccurate as they were, lol!……I would have loved to have worn any of themLaugh

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh144/nicksbabe28/Backstreet%20n%20Graffix/Image4-1.jpg

March 11, 2012
12:35 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Sophie1536 said

I thought Mary Tudor’s clothes were really lovely in the series Smile
I loved all the clothes inaccurate as they were, lol!……I would have loved to have worn any of themLaugh

I agree. But equally so the clothes seemed to be too lightweight if that makes sence. Woman and especially KOA wore heavy fathingales to make there skirts more round in shape, and also because a lot of ladies like to have lapdogs who used to walk with their mistress hidden under their skirts. I think it was also perhaps to make easier for ladies to urinate, they couldn’t just run into a corner and stand with their hands in the approriate postion for a few secs, but they could back up into the corner a squat without losing any dignity. as their fathingales would have to be lifted to prevent getting wee’d on. Anne Boleyn I believe wore a farthingale at her coronation banquet and sat on a chair with a bucket underneath it so she could relieve herself without having to leave her seat, again that wouldn’t be possible if she hadn’t of been wearing a farthingale. Also the bodices seem to movable, if that again makes sence. Woman, married or not wore Corsets made of either wood or whalebone or should I say bone of some sort, there would have been none of this quite yank bodice off boobs exposed lark. Only very young girls wore movable bodices. Also seeing young Edward in men’s clothes wouldn’t have beeen right as boys up till a certain age wore dresses I think this was perhaps easier for them to be able to urinate, until the got the hang of getting used to undoing their breeches and moving aside their flat codpieces to wee. I think Anne perhaps used a smaller size farhingale but she still wore one, it was also a way of keeping the hems of their skirts from trailing in the muck and debris that was on the ground, dress material was costly and unless you were extremely rich or married to Royality it simply wasn’t on to expect to buy dress material every week to make a new dress just because the one you were wearing had got mucky. Even so I enjoy watching The Tudors despite the inaccurcies and the bad acting.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

March 11, 2012
6:55 pm
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 782
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

But the costumes are sooo pretty! I especially loved Anne’s gold one in the dream sequence when Henry is chasing her and she tells him to ‘seduce her with poems’. Anyways, I wrote this topic because in all the movies you see dresses that are the same yet so very different. And i’ve always wondered what did they actually wear?

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

March 12, 2012
5:44 am
Avatar
Elliemarianna
Corsham, Wiltshire
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 316
Member Since:
June 7, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Firstly Women would have worn a smock, which was an undergarment made of cotton I believe. They changed this everyday as it was considered hygienic to do so. A corset may have been worn over this, called ‘bodies’. These were not as tightly boned as Victorian style corsets. They would have also worn stockings, which came to just above the knee, being kept up with a garter and thin ribbon. A Partlet was worn over this which was a shirt and had pattens sown into them around the collar in black or brown thread. This is because these areas could be seen under the dress depending on the style of dress worn. They would have worn a farthingale which puffed out the skirt giving it an A-line shape. If they wanted their dresses to puff out even more they would of worn a Bumroll which was a padded crescent tied around the hips. Over this they would have worn a Kirtle which was an entire gown, minus the sleeves. Over this was the gown and sleeves which was the dress everyone saw. The sleeves were pinned on. Gowns were usually richly embroidered and a stomacher was often pinned on, as seen in Jane Seymour’s portrait. They then wore a girdle which was a jewelled belt which often had a pomander on the end to hide bad smells. These were made from oranges stuffed with cloves. They often had books attached too. Headwear was quite varied, although the most popular styles were the English hood or French hood. Only virgins and the un-married could show their hair, although a Queen during her coronation could show her hair as tradition and obviously because the crown would not fit over a headdress. There were other types of headdress, such as a coif which was a net, which Anne wore when she played ‘Perseverance’.

"It is however but Justice, & my Duty to declre that this amiable Woman was entirely innocent of the Crimes with which she was accused, of which her Beauty, her Elegance, & her Sprightliness were sufficient proofs..." Jane Austen.

March 13, 2012
1:19 am
Avatar
Sophie1536
Lincolnshire UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 305
Member Since:
January 17, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I wonder what became of the costumes worn in the Tudors? More than likely the BBC will have kept them for further productions down the line, personally I think they should have given them to us, lol! OMG, how I’d love to have one of those dresses!!! Maybe not the best garment for doing the housework in but hey I would still like to have one of the costumes just to sit in and dream of life at court! WinkWinkWink

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh144/nicksbabe28/Backstreet%20n%20Graffix/Image4-1.jpg

March 13, 2012
8:55 am
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Elliemarianna said

Firstly Women would have worn a smock, which was an undergarment made of cotton I believe. They changed this everyday as it was considered hygienic to do so. A corset may have been worn over this, called ‘bodies’. These were not as tightly boned as Victorian style corsets. They would have also worn stockings, which came to just above the knee, being kept up with a garter and thin ribbon. A Partlet was worn over this which was a shirt and had pattens sown into them around the collar in black or brown thread. This is because these areas could be seen under the dress depending on the style of dress worn. They would have worn a farthingale which puffed out the skirt giving it an A-line shape. If they wanted their dresses to puff out even more they would of worn a Bumroll which was a padded crescent tied around the hips. Over this they would have worn a Kirtle which was an entire gown, minus the sleeves. Over this was the gown and sleeves which was the dress everyone saw. The sleeves were pinned on. Gowns were usually richly embroidered and a stomacher was often pinned on, as seen in Jane Seymour’s portrait. They then wore a girdle which was a jewelled belt which often had a pomander on the end to hide bad smells. These were made from oranges stuffed with cloves. They often had books attached too. Headwear was quite varied, although the most popular styles were the English hood or French hood. Only virgins and the un-married could show their hair, although a Queen during her coronation could show her hair as tradition and obviously because the crown would not fit over a headdress. There were other types of headdress, such as a coif which was a net, which Anne wore when she played ‘Perseverance’.

Ellie, However I think up until Anne, came back from France, that the French hood became more popular, yes it was worn by some ladies of the court but it wasn’t seen as any thing spectacular. The Gable hood was the excepted norm of woman’s head dresses. I couldn’t imagine wearing anything like that. It must have been very uncomfortable to wear, makes my hair itch just thing about it. The headress that really got me was the conical shaped one in the reign of Edward 4th, you could spear food with it 2 tables over and it seems that the higher the headdress the higher you were in class or so I believe.. One false move with one of those on your head and your’ll topple sideways. Still I suppose it was a good way of keeping the cobwebs down as you would sweep the ceiling every time you walked past..

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

March 13, 2012
10:10 am
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Or how about the headpieces that looked like a pair of bull horns? Where was the beauty in them? They were awful.
I think Anne popularised the french hood when she was queen, and when Jane became queen, she demanded her women go back to wearing those gable hoods. They look like a box on their heads.

March 13, 2012
10:23 am
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Sharon said

Or how about the headpieces that looked like a pair of bull horns? Where was the beauty in them? They were awful.
I think Anne popularised the french hood when she was queen, and when Jane became queen, she demanded her women go back to wearing those gable hoods. They look like a box on their heads.

Yeah I agree. the Gable hoods did look like a roof end on your head, actually that’s exactly what they were wasn’t it? The Bull horns head dress was weird.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

March 13, 2012
10:36 am
Avatar
Bella44
New Zealand
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 934
Member Since:
January 9, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The gable hoods were just hideous and I particularly dislike how Jane Seymour wore it, with one side of the veil (or whatever it was) pinned up and into a weird pointy shape. At least the way Katherine of Aragon wore it, with both parts of the veil left down, was slightly more flattering.

March 21, 2012
1:59 am
Avatar
Sophie1536
Lincolnshire UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 305
Member Since:
January 17, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I really loved Anne’s dress when she came to Henry as he was dying, think it was black and white. Anne looked beautiful in that and she should have worn it earlier Wink

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh144/nicksbabe28/Backstreet%20n%20Graffix/Image4-1.jpg

March 21, 2012
6:32 pm
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 782
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I don’t understand why it was such a huge deal for them to wear hoods..? I know about the dirty hair thing but it was okay for unmarried woman, but whatever that was there ‘thing’ so who am I to judge? I really liked the French hoods, very pretty and I liked how it showed off their hair – modern day hair band opposed to 16th century hoods? ….

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

August 14, 2012
3:22 am
Avatar
Gill
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 118
Member Since:
June 15, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The ‘A’ line shape came in later in Henry’s reign, Kathryn Howard and Katherine Parr’s time, earlier dresses had a more natural shape. Oh, and a coif is not a net, it’s a fabric cap that completely covers the hair, and would have been worn under most headdresses (with the exception of a French Hood) and also when no headdress was being worn. They were worn for centuries. They were sometimes richly embroidered, and sometimes plain white linen. Apparently one exists at Hever that was supposedly embroidered by Anne herself.

This is a coif of Henry’s time, possibly modelled by the lady herself…

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v245/gda63/894.jpgImage Enlarger

August 14, 2012
9:38 pm
Avatar
Anyanka
La Belle Province
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2345
Member Since:
November 18, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Mya Elise said

I don’t understand why it was such a huge deal for them to wear hoods..? I know about the dirty hair thing but it was okay for unmarried woman, but whatever that was there ‘thing’ so who am I to judge? I really liked the French hoods, very pretty and I liked how it showed off their hair – modern day hair band opposed to 16th century hoods? ….

I’m under the impression it was a modesty issue, like some Muslim women , Orthodox Jewish women and Amish and related branches of Christainity who cover their hair even now.

It's always bunnies.

August 15, 2012
2:26 am
Avatar
Gill
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 118
Member Since:
June 15, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I also think to a large extent it was just tradition – people did it because they had always done it. Even unmarried women usually wore something on their heads even though it was acceptable not to. Also, of course, in the days before central heating, much of the time it was just too darn cold to wander around with your head uncovered.

August 17, 2012
7:43 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Gill said

The ‘A’ line shape came in later in Henry’s reign, Kathryn Howard and Katherine Parr’s time, earlier dresses had a more natural shape. Oh, and a coif is not a net, it’s a fabric cap that completely covers the hair, and would have been worn under most headdresses (with the exception of a French Hood) and also when no headdress was being worn. They were worn for centuries. They were sometimes richly embroidered, and sometimes plain white linen. Apparently one exists at Hever that was supposedly embroidered by Anne herself.

This is a coif of Henry’s time, possibly modelled by the lady herself…

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v245/gda63/894.jpgImage Enlarger

So…not a nightcap then? Embarassed C’mon, admit it people, I wasn’t the only one who wondered why would Anne have a portrait done in her nightclothes! Kiss

August 18, 2012
3:10 am
Avatar
Anyanka
La Belle Province
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2345
Member Since:
November 18, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The talk about farthingales earlier in the thread reminded me of a book I read when I was in my late teens/early 20’s, Mills and Boon/Harlequin type book.

The heroine spent several long, and tedious, passages describing her heavy crinoloine hoops and multiple petticoats. And then danced the waltz with her beau “thigh to thigh”….Surprised

It's always bunnies.

August 18, 2012
4:56 am
Avatar
Gill
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 118
Member Since:
June 15, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Sharon said

So…not a nightcap then? Embarassed C’mon, admit it people, I wasn’t the only one who wondered why would Anne have a portrait done in her nightclothes! Kiss

Well, although that is definitely a coif, she does look like she’s deshabille. My pet theory is that this sketch was just a preliminary work – maybe Holbein intended (or even did) work it up later into a more regally dressed portrait, which sadly no longer exists. Numerous other Holbein sketches got worked up into more ‘finished’ portraits, it’s hard to believe he did not do one of Anne. Or maybe it was sketched for Henry, who surely wouldn’t have objected to a pic of Anne in her nightclothes…?

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 70

Currently Online:
14 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Anyanka: 2345

Boleyn: 2285

Sharon: 2115

Bella44: 934

DuchessofBrittany: 847

Mya Elise: 782

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 426041

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 13

Topics: 1679

Posts: 23600

Newest Members:

franklingo18, HorinadR, estherqw4, enriquebo2, Delaquand, esperanzamt3

Administrators: Claire: 998