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My rant on Philippa Gregory ( please forgive me)
June 25, 2013
12:47 pm
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Boleyn
Kent.
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That’s true Louise, but I was extremely annoyed by S.W.M.N.B.N, by portraying as a homosexual capable of committing incest. However I myself would like to give her a slap, just because I want to. LOL.
Either way I would still like to see you, Anyanka and Sharon tear S.W.M.N.B.N a new arsenal…

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

June 25, 2013
12:47 pm
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Steve Callaghan
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I love Mantel’s Tudor novels but I feel Louise is right – even with the defence that Mantel characterises George Boleyn through the prism of Cromwell’s biased perspective, there’s no excuse for portraying George in one dimension: as a use-free fop. That goes against the grain of depicting Cromwell as a man with literary taste, for one thing; George’s excellent and innovative poetry alone would have given TC pause.

A guest post by Clare Cherry lauds George’s talent in this sphere:

http://www.theanneboleynfiles……-the-poet/

EDIT: Although perhaps Cromwell might dismiss poetry (in this particular context) to be a merely frivolous pastime of the gentlemen surrounding Henry – and, in this, Mantel has a point of sorts – someone with good literary taste would ignore the source and consider the poetry on its own merits.

June 25, 2013
12:58 pm
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Louise
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SteveJ said

I love Mantel’s Tudor novels but I feel Louise is right – even with the defence that Mantel characterises George Boleyn through the prism of Cromwell’s biased perspective, there’s no excuse for portraying George in one dimension: as a use-free fop. That goes against the grain of depicting Cromwell as a man with literary taste, for one thing; George’s excellent and innovative poetry alone would have given TC pause.

A guest post by Clare Cherry lauds George’s talent in this sphere:

http://www.theanneboleynfiles……-the-poet/

For Mantel to use the defense that George was being viewed through Cromwell’s biased perspective doesn’t work. If she took into account the primary sources then there’s no evidence to say that the men had a poor relationship, and the evidence we do have shows that Cromwell admired George. I think George is portrayed more from the biased perspective of Mantel. As for crying at his trial and having to be helped to a chair, that particular piece of artistic license is so awful that Mantel should hang her head in shame.Cry

Glad you liked the poet article.Smile

June 25, 2013
1:09 pm
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Steve Callaghan
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Yes, good points again, Louise. And that was an excellent article of yours.:)

Hilary’s personal biases bleed through the text..even her religious biases. Me, I love Wolf Hall in particular for the moments in which Mantel allows the reader to step away from the story; interludes like those mentioned below (from an excerpt of a review I wrote):

‘…there are sublime moments when we step outside of the story’s main thrust – Shakespearean or, more accurately, Wellesian interludes when the reader can almost see the mist rising from the Thames, hear the cries of the boatmen, watch dandelion clocks at play as they’re borne on the summer breeze – while Mantel has Cromwell’s thoughts tell us home truths that the sheer distraction of this world’s ‘show business’ obscures:

The fate of peoples is made like this, two men in small rooms. Forget the coronations, the conclaves of cardinals, the pomp and processions. This is how the world changes: a counter pushed across a table, a pen stroke that alters the force of a phrase, a woman’s sigh as she passes and leaves on the air a trail of orange flower or rose water; her hand pulling close the bed curtain, the discreet sigh of flesh against flesh.

June 25, 2013
1:40 pm
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Louise
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I’m sure she’s a brilliant writer, but I just wish to God the woman would write about fictional characters rather than destroy the moral integrity of people who actually lived, including poor Cromwell. By the way, one comment in that sentence was untrue, and it wasn’t the one about Cromwell.Wink

June 25, 2013
2:16 pm
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Steve Callaghan
UK
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Laugh

Perhaps I should claim instead that she’s an effective writer, rather than a brilliant one; for example, I didn’t finish Beyond Black because it disturbed me so. Anyway, Wolf Hall is too much of a love letter to Cromwell to justify its inclusion amongst the truly great novels of the age.

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