Love Letter 4

MY MISTRESS & FRIEND,
my heart and I surrender our-
selves into your hands, beseeching
you to hold us commended to your
favour, and that by absence your af-
feftion to us may not be lessened:
for it were a great pity to increase
our pain, of which absence produces
enough and more than I could ever
have thought could be felt, remind-
ing us of a point in astronomy which
is this: the longer the days are, the
more distant is the sun, and never-
theless the hotter; so is it with our
love, for by absence we are kept a
distance from one another, and yet
it retains its fervour, at least on my
side; I hope the like on yours, as-
suring you that on my part the pain
of absence is already too great for
me; and when I think of the increase
of that which I am forced to suffer,
it would be almost intolerable, but
for the firm hope I have of your un-
changeable affedtion for me: and to
remind you of this sometimes, and
seeing that I cannot be personally
present with you, I now send you the
nearest thing I can to that, namely,
my picture set in a bracelet, with the
whole of the device, which you al-
ready know, wishing myself in their
place, if it should please you. This is
from the hand of your loyal servant
and friend,

H.R.

6 Responses to “Love Letter 4”

  1. Rubí says:

    Did Anne really love Henry?

    [Reply]

    Rea Reply:

    I’m no historian, but I believe she did. In my opinion, what girl could read words like this, written just for her, and not develop some sort of affection for the writer?

    [Reply]

    janet Reply:

    I have researched a considerable volllume of marriage contracts of the noble and royal families during this period, prior and subsequent. If love, true- love, was ever a factor, it was usually a brief and fortunate luxury. Daughters were groomed for a marriage of social advancement for the family in its entirety. The Noble daughters were prepared for this role usually spending their early years learning to behave with courtly graces. Much like the Geshia of Japan. Marriage contracts were written up fto the highest bidder, noble position and subsequent “social-climbing” possibilities.
    Did Anne Boleyn, really love Henry VIII ? II think Anne, did the bidding of her parents, king and was smart enough not to settle for less than many “mistresses” prior. Unfortunately, she underestimated her adversary and health issues. I believe that Syphillis, contributed to his iinability to conceive and later irrational behavior. At a time when wives who were diagmosed with such , were considered aulteresses, (iNever their husbands!), they suffered in silence.
    interestingly today, men still try to blame an episode of an STD, on their wives and girlfriends. So, very little has changed now, in 2014!!! Money trumps “LOVE” most times in middle-upper classes and above. EDUCATION HAS BEEN THE GREAT EQUALIZER!! Though, women still get paid less and are promoted less often. For a woman to compete with her male counterparts, she must be the equivalent of an NFL draft pick. Yup! These are the averages.. Like winning the lLottery-of sorts!
    Thanks for reading my perspective/experience and correlation.
    From an opinionated, over-educated and qualified employee, with limited health benefits, insulting wages and sexual disrespect on 3 out of 5 jobs.-consistently since I was 17. Should have sued, but it was the eighties, I was young and information limited, deliberately- shrouded or just not available under law. some changes now, but they are weak. basically, a public shaming, (both parties!), and occasionally- restitution of minimal amounts..Not much has SIGNIFIGANTLY changed.

    [Reply]

  2. a reader says:

    Henry is offering his picture as a present.. it’s not awkward?
    she falls for a man who already had 5 wifes … didn’t see she a pattern here?
    No wonder she ended up replaced and beheaded..

    [Reply]

    Claire Reply:

    Miniature portraits were done especially to give away and so Henry was just following tradition. Henry, at this time, had only been married once (Catherine of Aragon) and was obviously still married to her, so there was no pattern for Anne to see. Henry was convinced that his marriage was against Biblical law and so was invalid.

    [Reply]

    Kristine Reply:

    He had only one wife at this time…she was the second, the other four came after her

    [Reply]

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