4 May 1536 – Jane Boleyn sends a message of comfort to her husband

Posted By on May 4, 2016

Signature of Jane Boleyn, Lady Rochford

Signature of Jane Boleyn, Lady Rochford

Around 4th May 1536, in his daily report to Thomas Cromwell, Sir William Kingston, Constable of the Tower of London, wrote of Jane Boleyn, Lady Rochford, sending a message to her husband, George, who was imprisoned in the Tower.

Kingston’s letters to Cromwell were damaged in a fire in 1731 at Ashburnam House, but they are still an excellent primary source. Here is what he said about Jane’s message and George’s reaction (the dots are the illegible parts):

“After your departynge yesterday, Greneway gentelman ysshar cam to me & . . . Mr. Caro and Master Bryan commanded hym in the kyngs name to my [Lord of] Rotchfort from my lady hys wyf, and the message was now more . . . se how he dyd; and also she wold humly sut unto the kyngs hy[nes] . . . for hyr husband; and so he gaf hyr thanks […]”1

So, from this, we know that Sir Nicholas Carew and Sir Francis Bryan had commanded a gentleman usher called Greenway to carry a message from Jane Boleyn to George. The message was to see how he was doing in the Tower and to assure him that Jane would petition the king on his behalf. George sent a message of thanks back to her.

There is no evidence that Jane did petition Henry VIII or Thomas Cromwell, but that’s not to say that she didn’t. Although some historians have said that while she was sending this message to George she was actually busy giving Cromwell information and went on to become “the principal witness in the Crown’s case” against the Boleyns, this just is not backed up by contemporary sources.2 Justice John Spelman, in his report of the case against Anne Boleyn in 1536, named Bridget Wiltshire, Lady Wingfield, as posthumously providing evidence:

“And all the evidence was of bawdery and lechery, so that there was no such whore in the realm. Note that this matter was disclosed by a woman called Lady Wingfeilde, who had been a servant to the said queen and of the same qualities; and suddenly the said Wingfeilde became sick and a short time before her death showed this matter to one of her… [the rest is missing].”3

(more…)

COMMENTS ABOUT "4 May 1536 – Jane Boleyn sends a message of comfort to her husband"
7 COMMENTS - LEAVE YOURS »

Related Posts

  • No Related Posts Found

3 May 1536 – A shocked Archbishop Cranmer writes to the King

Posted By on May 3, 2016

Cranmer_etchingOn Wednesday 3rd May 1536, Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, who had travelled back to Lambeth Palace from Knole (his country residence) after being summoned back to court, wrote a letter to King Henry VIII:

“Have come to Lambeth, according to Mr. Secretary’s letters, to know your Grace’s pleasure. Dare not, contrary to the said letters, presume to come to your presence, but of my bounden duty I beg you “somewhat to suppress the deep sorrows of your Grace’s heart,” and take adversity patiently. Cannot deny that you have great causes of heaviness, and that your honor is highly touched. God never sent you a like trial; but if He find you no less patient and thankful than when all things succeeded to your wish, I suppose you never did thing more acceptable to Him. You will give Him occasion to increase His benefits, as He did to Job.

(more…)

COMMENTS ABOUT "3 May 1536 – A shocked Archbishop Cranmer writes to the King"
NONE YET - PLEASE LEAVE ONE »

2 May 1536 – The arrests of Queen Anne Boleyn and Lord Rochford

2 May 1536 – The arrests of Queen Anne Boleyn and Lord Rochford

On the morning of Tuesday 2nd May 1536, Sir Henry Norris was escorted to the Tower of London. He had been interrogated the previous day by the King himself and George Constantine, one of Norris’s servants, wrote of how the King “promised him his pardon in case he would utter the truth” but that “Mr. […]

1 May 1536 – An abandoned May Day joust

1 May 1536 – An abandoned May Day joust

On 1st May 1536, King Henry VIII and his second wife, Queen Anne Boleyn, attended the traditional May Day joust at Greenwich Palace. The joust started well. George Boleyn, Lord Rochford, the Queen’s brother, led the challengers and Sir Henry Norris, Groom of the Stool, led the defenders. At one point, Norris’s horse refused to […]

30 April 1536 – Arguments and interrogations

30 April 1536 – Arguments and interrogations

On Sunday 30th April 1536, according to Alexander Alesius, the Scottish theologian who was visiting the English court at Greenwich Palace, Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn had an argument. He couldn’t hear what it was about but it was clear to him that the King was angry. Read more… On that same day, court musician […]

The Rivalry of Charles Brandon and Anne Boleyn by Sarah Bryson

The Rivalry of Charles Brandon and Anne Boleyn by Sarah Bryson

To celebrate the release of her biography of Charles Brandon, Charles Brandon: The King’s Man, Sarah Bryson is joining us today with a guest article on Brandon and Anne Boleyn. Thank you, Sarah, and good luck with your book! Queen Anne Boleyn, second wife of King Henry VIII, and Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, had […]

29 April 1536 – Anne Boleyn, Sir Henry Norris and Mark Smeaton

29 April 1536 – Anne Boleyn, Sir Henry Norris and Mark Smeaton

On Saturday 29th April 1536, Queen Anne Boleyn had two separate encounters with two courtiers who would end up being accused of sleeping with her and of plotting the King’s death with her. The first encounter was with Mark Smeaton, a groom of the privy chamber, a court musician and a man who had been […]

Alchemy and Sorcery, and a book giveaway too!

Alchemy and Sorcery, and a book giveaway too!

A big welcome to author Toni Mount who is visiting us today on the final stop of the book/blog tour for her debut historical novel The Colour of Poison: A Sebastian Foxley Medieval Murder Mystery. It’s a wonderful novel and if you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a paperback copy then […]