Maundy Thursday in my Village

Posted By on April 18, 2014

I just wanted to share with you some photos from last night’s Maundy Thursday procession in my village. Thanks to Tim for taking them.

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18 April 1536 – Chapuys Bows to Queen Anne Boleyn

Posted By on April 18, 2014

Eustace ChapuysOn Tuesday 18th April 1536, the Imperial ambassador, Eustace Chapuys, met Anne Boleyn in the chapel of Greenwich Palace. He had refused the offer of visiting Anne and kissing her hand, claiming that such “a visit would not be advisable” and begging Cromwell to excuse him, but the King had other ideas.1 George Boleyn, Lord Rochford, conducted the ambassador to mass and manoeuvred him behind the door through which Anne would enter. As Anne entered with the King, she turned, stopped and bowed to Chapuys. Chapuys had no choice but to bow in return. Chapuys recorded this event in a letter to Charles V:

“I was conducted to mass by lord Rochford, the concubine’s brother, and when the King came to the offering there was a great concourse of people partly to see how the concubine and I behaved to each other. She was courteous enough, for when I was behind the door by which she entered, she returned, merely to do me reverence as I did to her.”2

Paul Friedmann, in his 1884 book “Anne Boleyn”, writes that “a good many people who had hoped that Chapuis would be rude to his former enemy were grievously vexed, and Mary herself was astonished when she heard that the ambassador of the emperor had bowed to ‘that woman’.”3 Friedmann cites a letter from Chapuys to Granvelle, in which Chapuys writes:

(more…)

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Good Friday

Good Friday

Today is Good Friday, the day when Christians like me remember Christ’s sacrifice in dying for our sins on the cross. On Good Friday in Tudor times, people attended the ceremony known as “Creeping to the Cross”. Christ’s suffering and crucifixion, and what it meant, were commemorated by the clergy creeping up to a crucifix […]

Maundy Thursday or Holy Thursday

Maundy Thursday or Holy Thursday

Today is Maundy Thursday, a day in the Christian calendar which commemorates the Last Supper, that final meal that Jesus Christ had with his disciples before his arrest. On Maundy Thursday in Tudor times the church was prepared for Easter with water and wine being used to wash the altars. It was also traditional for […]

13 April 1536 – Anne Boleyn and Maundy Thursday

13 April 1536 – Anne Boleyn and Maundy Thursday

Yesterday I wrote about Anne Boleyn attending Easter Eve mass as Queen and now we fast-forward three years and find her taking part in Easter celebrations just over a month before her execution. On the 13th April 1536, Maundy Thursday, Anne Boleyn did her duty as Queen, distributing Maundy money (alms) and washing the feet […]

12 April 1533 – Anne Boleyn Attends Easter Eve Mass as Queen

12 April 1533 – Anne Boleyn Attends Easter Eve Mass as Queen

Following Henry VIII’s orders to his council the previous day to accord Anne Boleyn royal honours, and Catherine of Aragon’s demotion to Dowager Princess of Wales, the pregnant Anne attended mass on Holy Saturday in the Queen’s Closet of Greenwich Palace “with all the pomp of a Queen, clad in cloth of gold, and loaded […]

11 April 1533 – Anne Boleyn is Accorded Royal Honours and Cranmer works on the Annulment

11 April 1533 – Anne Boleyn is Accorded Royal Honours and Cranmer works on the Annulment

On 11th April 1533 Henry VIII informed his Council that Anne was his rightful wife and Queen and that she should be accorded with royal honours.1 On the same day Thomas Cranmer, the newly consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury, wrote to the King “Beseeching the King very humbly to allow him to determine his great cause […]

A Portrait and A Gentleman: The Portrait of Catherine Knollys, and the Gentlemen Pensioners of Henry VIII

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Today we have a guest post from Natasha Gennady Robinson, part one of a two-part series. Thank you so much, Natasha, for writing this wonderful article for us. Over to Natasha… There is but one portrait said to be of Catherine Knollys (née Carey), though as with the current trends, many historians seek to dispel […]