A special Richard III issue of Tudor Life

Posted By on February 25, 2015

March 2015 Tudor LifeI can’t believe that it’s been six months since we launched the Tudor Society! I’m enjoying every minute of running it and it’s been heart-warming to have the support of so many Anne Boleyn Files followers, history bloggers, authors and historians. The Society has grown rapidly and is going from strength to strength. Thank you!

We now have seven regular contributors to our Tudor Life magazine and guest writers have included Leanda de Lisle, Jessie Childs, Toni Mount, Susan Higginbotham, Derek Wilson, Elizabeth Fremantle, Nancy Bilyeau, Olga Hughes, J Stephan Edwards, Tamise Hills, Natalie Grueninger, Sarah Morris, Mike Ingram, Debra Bayani, Sandra Vasoli, Karen Bowman, Wendy Dunn, Anne Clinard Barnhill, Robert Stephen Parry and many more… All those historians and authors sharing their Tudor knowledge and expertise! Amazing stuff.

The March edition of Tudor Life, which is out now, has a special Richard III section featuring special articles from John Ashdown-Hill, David Baldwin, Josephine Wilkinson, Kristie Dean, Susan Fern, Olga Hughes and Toni Mount. From the Princes in the Tower, Richard III the “Usurper”, the DNA research, to the lady who made silk tassels for Richard’s coronation, we’ve covered a range of Richard topics! It seems an appropriate way to remember this monarch in the month of his reinterment.

And, not forgetting the Tudors, we also have Tudor-themed articles from renowned Tudor historian Derek Wilson, our in-house art historian Melanie Taylor, Tudor music expert Jane Moulder (from the group Piva), and Gareth Russell, Beth von Staats, Kyra Kramer and others.

You can enjoy a sample of the magazine, which includes an article by historian John Ashdown-Hill, at https://www.tudorsociety.com/sample-march-2015-magazine/

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What did Anne Boleyn look like and does it really matter?

Posted By on February 23, 2015

Anne BoleynHistorian and author Conor Byrne discusses Anne Boleyn’s physical appearance, primary source descriptions of Anne and the controversy over her appearance in an article over on The Tudor Society website.

Here’s an excerpt and you can just click on “more” to read the rest of the article.

Every aspect of Anne Boleyn’s life is controversial. Her birth date, her personality, her relationship with Henry VIII, whether she was guilty of the crimes attributed to her – all of these, and more, arouse fierce debate. But it is Anne’s physical appearance that is perhaps the most lingering and heated of controversies about her. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the news this week, when it was declared that the Nidd Hall portrait of Anne is in fact a realistic depiction of Anne, because of its close match to the 1534 medal bearing a defaced Anne alongside her motto ‘The Most Happi’. Yet the researchers involved in this have warned that their recent findings have been misinterpreted by the press. The overall results from their research remain incomplete. So much, then, for discovering what Anne Boleyn ‘really’ looked like.

As Susan Bordo notes, ‘beyond the dark hair and eyes, the olive skin, the small moles, and the likelihood of a tiny extra nail on her little finger, we know very little with certainty about what Anne looked like’, in no small part because of the campaign of destruction waged against her by her husband after her death, in which portraits of her were destroyed. Contemporary descriptions of Anne’s appearance, moreover, were rarely objective and were influenced by religious, political and cultural mores, viewing her either as a paradigm of religious virtue or as the incarnation of the Devil. Nicholas Sander, a hostile Jesuit priest writing in the reign of Anne’s daughter Elizabeth I, clearly subscribed to the latter view:

More…

You may also want to read the following articles here on The Anne Boleyn Files:

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22 February 1511 – Henry VIII loses a son

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The Nidd Hall Portrait matches the 1534 Anne Boleyn Medal

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