Quotes

Here are some famous quotes about Queen Anne Boleyn…

The very ink of history is written with fluid prejudice — Mark Twain

No English Queen has made more impact on the history of the nation than Anne Boleyn, and few have been so persistently maligned. — Joanna Denny “Anne Boleyn: A New Life of England’s Tragic Queen”

Though God cannot alter the past, historians can. — Samuel Butler

I have never had better opinions of woman than I had of her. — Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, Anne Boleyn’s pastor and Boleyn family friend.

For her behaviour, manners, attire and tongue she excelled them all. — Lancelot de Carles

Her excellent grace and behaviour — George Cavendish, usher to Cardinal Wolsey, when explaining why Anne stood out from the rest of women at court.

She (Anne) knew perfectly how to sing and dance…to play the lute and other instruments. — Lancelot de Carles

Imbued with as many outward good qualities in playing on instruments, singing, and such other courtly graces, as few women were of her time. — William Thomas

Very beautiful. — Francesco Sanuto, Venetian Diplomat

I find her so bright and pleasant for her young age that I am more beholden to you for sending her to me than you are to me. — Archduchess Margaret of Austria, who trained Anne as a maid of honour in her household.

He’s marrying the perfect wife for him [Jane Seymour], and he’s learned that he doesn’t need an Anne Boleyn – another partner in crime to help him take over the world. He just needs a wonderful, supportive wife to take care of him when he comes home from a hard day beheading people. — Jonathan Rhys Meyers

I will not give them up to a person who is the scandal of Christendom and a disgrace to you. — Catherine of Aragon, talking about Henry’s request for her to pass the jewels he gave her on to Anne Boleyn.

The King’s Grace is ruled by one common stewed whore, Anne Boleyn, who makes all the spirituality to be beggared, and the temporality also. — Abbot of Whitby 1530

Your Majesty must root out the Lady and her adherents…. This accursed Anne has her foot in the stirrup, and will do the Queen and the Princess all the harm she can. She has boasted that she will make the Princess her lady-in-waiting, or marry her to some varlet. — Eustace Chapuys (Imperial Ambassador), writing to Emperor Charles V in 1533

If it be true that is openly reported of the Queen’s Grace… I am in such perplexity that my mind is clean amazed; for I never had better opinion in woman than I had in her; which maketh me to think that she should not be culpable… Next to Your Grace, I was most bound to her of all creatures living… I wish and pray for her that she may declare herself inculpable and innocent… I loved her not a little for the love which I judged her to bear towards God and His Gospel. — Archbishop Thomas Cranmer’s comments about Anne when writing to Henry VIII after her arrest.

It was not a coalition of factions that brought down Anne but Henry’s disaffection caused by her miscarriage of a defective child, the one act, besides adultery, that would certainly destroy his trust in her. — Retha M Warnicke

She who has been the Queen of England on earth will today become a Queen in Heaven. — Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, on hearing of Anne Boleyn’s execution.

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55 Responses to “Quotes”

  1. JUNE DECK says:

    As an avid Anne admirer, I have read all I can ever find on her and never have I read so many beautiful quotes about her, thankyou so much for making them available. Always I have thought the information most widely published must be one sided, for whatever her pitfalls, she must have been an extraordinary woman for so many people such as myself to still be so interested in finding out all we can after 500 years!

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  2. Claire says:

    Thank you, June! I really must get round to adding some new quotes here! Yes, I believe she was an extraordinary woman and she would be bemused, honoured and humbled, I think, to know that we are still discussing her today. Thanks for your comment.

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    Rex Reply:

    well……maybe not “humbled”.

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  3. Janette Parlett says:

    Does anyone know if Anne Boleyn did say ‘My blood shall have been well spent’, (talking of her and Henry’s daughter Elizabeth I), while awaiting execution in the tower?

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  4. Claire says:

    I haven’t been able to find any record of her saying that in the Tower. I love the speech that Anne makes to Henry in that scene in “Anne of the Thousand Days” and I would love it to have happened in real life. Here’s the whole of what she says:
    “But Elizabeth is yours. Watch her as she grows; she’s yours. She’s a Tudor! Get yourself a son off of that sweet, pale girl if you can – and hope that he will live! But Elizabeth shall reign after you! Yes, Elizabeth – child of Anne the Whore and Henry the Blood-Stained Lecher – shall be Queen! And remember this: Elizabeth shall be a greater queen than any king of yours! She shall rule a greater England than you could ever have built! Yes – MY Elizabeth SHALL BE QUEEN! And my blood will have been well spent!”
    Wonderful! And that scene does show Anne’s spirit and courage in the face of impending doom.

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    Marie Thresia Reply:

    I am so amazed by the story of Anne Boleyn and all that goes along with her changing history history in many ways. I also am a history buff and inpaticular in love with the Tudors Dynast. I also love the movie Anne of a Thousand Days. Old but still captures her in a new light. Also the way she was made into character during the Showtime series The Tudors. I think that series captured both King Henry the Eighth and Anne Boleyn,along with all the major counter parts that were influencial in henry’s court in that time. Such as Charles Brandon, Thomas Moore, Cardinal Wolsey. I just really enjoy any education,stories about that specific time in England. Also am very interested in Queen Elizabeth.

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  5. Jack says:

    No you got that out of Anne of the thousand days that was fictional.

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  6. Miriam says:

    But isn’t that what Claire said? It was from the movie ‘Anne of a Thousand Days.’ Claire just wishes it could have been true, as it sums up the strength, power and passion, that was Anne Boleyn….

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    Marie Thresia Reply:

    Yes she did say she was quoting the movie.

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  7. Claire says:

    Hi Miriam,
    Yes, I did say that it was from the movie but I would love for it to have happened in real life. Hope you had a good Christmas x

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  8. katie says:

    My favorite Anne Boleyn quote; “Thus it will be: Grudge who grudge.”

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  9. katie says:

    That, along with her initial pendant, will be my next tattoo =-)

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  10. christina says:

    she did it is in her journals she kept, that are locked up in england close to were she was killed. if you have the tudors first season and there is a part they tell and show what is made up set and not it shows the memorial for the queen.i could be wrong but well may be real wrong but her daughter when took thrown built it, now it is a very buitiful glass center peice. but their is a spot all the journals from the kings and queens are kept near by, and only select few pages are availible that would basically be in the historian books. i have a friend over their and she told me, so this is hear say also but something to think on. just amagine what those books hold.

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  11. I love the quote by Thomas Cranmer so much, i’ve had it tattooed down my right leg x

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  12. joan charles says:

    I SURE WISH THAT I LIVED IN THE UK.. I SIMPLY CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF ANNE BOLEYN, THEN I COULD SEE WITH MY OWN EYES, WHERE ALL HISTORY TOOK PLACE, MAYBE ONE DAY I CAN MAKE A TRIP THERE….CAN ANYONE IMAGINE THE ABSOLUTE TERROR ANNE FELT WAITING HER EXECUTION?? IT IS TOO AWFUL THINKING ABOUT IT….

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    holly Reply:

    A brave, brave woman! :)

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  13. Callum says:

    Thankyou for showing an interest in one of the greatest women to walk on this earth!
    The scene from ‘Anne of the Thousand Days’ truly does show her character to perfection. These quotes really provide you with another deeper insight into the psychological profile of Queen Anne Boleyn.

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  14. june deck says:

    I wanted to comment on the Anne of the Thousand Days speech, yes it was fiction but how well it played for those of us who beleive Anne to have been maligned. I saw it at age 10 and became an avid reader of all things Anne.Of course Genvieve Bujold could not have been better in my opinion, it is her I see when I think of Anne.

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  15. holly says:

    No English Queen has made more impact on the history of the nation than Anne Boleyn, and few have been so persistently maligned.— Joanna Denny “Anne Boleyn: A New Life of England’s Tragic Queen”
    (My favouirte) It makes me smile everytime I read it!

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  16. Grace says:

    Anne was the center of attention. She was very smart. “Exquisite”. There was something special about her, not just being the king’s wife, mother of a princess, daughter of earl of wiltshire but an exotic quality to her. Natalie Dormer brings her to life!

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  17. Ashley says:

    I have read a few books about Anne and all of them were very good
    I very much enjoy learning about Anne and her daughter Elizabeth Of the few portraits I have seen of Anne and her daughter they look so much besides the red hair, but in all I think Anne was very interesting and the quotes about her are amazing!!

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  18. Kay says:

    I can’t believe her last speech just before she was going to be executed. She must be such a courageous and extraordinary woman. She had four days in the Tower to digest the news of her upcoming execution. It must have been quite a torture. I certainly believe that there was really something special about her.

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  19. mikayal says:

    she was truly one of the most execptional women in our countries past, so strong and brave. you really have to admire wommen like her, they shine out from the pages of history :)
    oh and love the website :D

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  20. Sherrie m. says:

    My wish is that Henry could see what became of his daughter Elizabeth. I believe shame and a great feeling of loss he would have for his decision to cast Anne aside & execute her for Jane. She was his perfect match. What a fool he was. Anne & Elizabeth are, in my mind, two of the greatest women of all time. I too wish I could go to the UK. Once there, I will not want to come home to Virginia. How ironic that I live in the state named after her daughter. And although it may be estimated, my birthday is one day after Elizabeth’s. What an honour!

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  21. Jaclynn says:

    Im doing a National History Day project over why Henry changed the church, how he did it, and the reactions to it. Im currently trying to find resources of any kind. Letter, quotes, movies, well just anything and everything. Anne has been one of my major focuses right now, and I would greatly appreciate any and all advice, resources, websites, book titles. Over the short time of this project, I have became more interested in her and as well as the time period it’s self. Please also note my project will not be going as far back as the Tudors, but any information will be welcomed. Please also note, that my partner and I have a 500 word limit, and have already stretched our limits. Thanks you for comments and advice.

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  22. Joy says:

    Henry never met with Anne after her arrest. That scene from Anne of the 1000 days was the movies! I wish there were more quotes by her. She was too much woman for that fat pansy Henry.

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  23. barbara says:

    anne boleyn was cheating on the king and was disrespectful she deserved to be killed.

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    Claire Reply:

    Hi Barbara,
    There is no evidence that Anne did cheat on the King and it is more likely that she was framed and suffered an awful miscarriage of justice. See http://www.theanneboleynfiles.com/17934/anne-boleyn-a-cheat-who-deserved-death-i-dont-think-so/ where I have laid out the evidence for and against. Hope that helps.

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    chelsea Reply:

    Even if she was an adulterer which she was not that still does not mean she deserved to be beheaded. Nor is being disrespectful deserving of execution. Besides Henry had the marriage declared null and void therefore there was no marriage for her to cheat on! Something dear Henry didnt quite think through if you ask me…

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    tudor Rose Reply:

    I do not get why women would be disgraced and “beheaded” when men back then did it all the time.
    So unfair.

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    Cindy Reply:

    Really, you think so? Ann knew the consequences of screwing up. She would not have risked that for her future. There was also Elizabeth to consider.

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    Carolyn Reply:

    That is just utter nonsense. All of the historical documents sway to the fact that Cromwell did the King’s nidding by the trumped up charges. Ann Bolyen was a tragic figure in history. Ironically, she is “the Most Happy.” She was beautiful and intelligent. Intelligent enouigh not to have committed adultery against the King.

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    Rex Reply:

    Says who? HenryVIII? convenient.

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    paul Reply:

    Grow up!!!

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  24. Boleyn says:

    I love this quote by William Shakespeare, and if you think about it is is actually quite true too.
    Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

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  25. Mc.Hoeijmakers says:

    Im very in love with all that tells me about the tudor dynasty, but for some reason i can’t seem to find that much about Mary, Daughter of Henry and Catharine of Aragon.. is there a similar site like this about the life of Mary Tudor 1?

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    Randi Taylor-Habib Reply:

    There is plenty about Bloody Mary, hence the drink. She wrongfully tried to return England back to the Catholic state, causing untold blood shed. Basically the English people were burned by Thomas Moore if they were Calvinist or following Luther, then with the conversion via Henry VIII th and Thomas Cromwell, the church was prosecuted and many executed for holding to Catholic tenets.

    Then when Jane Seymour’s son died and after another Jane was killed by Mary’s troops, Mary began her bloody campaign against those who had wronged her mother, trying to force England back to the church, it was a disaster, and Elizabeth was soon Queen, her first task unfortunately was she had to have Mary executed as Mary was reportedly still trying to retake the throne.
    One of the most brutal aspects of hereditary kingdoms is that they often resulted in the execution of relatives to hold on to power. The Plantagenet Dynasty also often had to be put to death due to their claims.

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    Lourdes Reply:

    Think you’re confusing history – Elizabeth didn’t kill her sister. Perhaps you’re confusing it with Mary Queen of Scots.

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    Dawn ist Reply:

    There is a sister site to this one, Mc.Hoeijmakers, called the Elizabeth Files, there is quite a lot on there about Mary, try that for starters. Plus there are lots of books too if you like to read :)

    Was you refering to Lady Jane Grey, as the other Jane, Randi? cos she wasn’t killed by Mary’s troops, she was imprisoned in the Tower, and Mary had her executed at a later date…

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  26. I think Anne was able to face her execution/death some-what calmly, because she was, truly, a Christian person. She knew where her soul was going, she was aware that the only one that needed to know her heart and her sins was the Lord.
    In that, I truly believe she was as at peace as she was capable of. All of the accusations and lies, and the imprisonment had to have taken its toll.

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  27. solace says:

    Claire,

    What do you think of Alison Weir’s opinion on Henry and her reluctance to implicate him at all. I found it so difficult getting through her book on Anne because I feel it is patently clear that Henry was involved. Nothing would have happened without his approval and the Seymour’s were moved in next “door” some two months – I believe- before Anne’s death and the Executioner was sent for nine days before her trial. I mean really.

    Love to hear what you think Claire.

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  28. Carolyn Ramirez says:

    I have always wondered if Henry and Ann had incompatible positive/negative blood types – This would explain a successful first baby and the consequent still borns, etc. Just a thought.

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  29. Rachel says:

    My professor at Arizona State is Retha M. Warnicke!! I’ve taken a surey of England with her and a class called Tudor Monarchy. She is amazing! I’d highly recommend her book on Anne Boleyn and her latest work, Wicked Women of Tudor England

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  30. Misereti says:

    Thank you for this
    I love Anne
    She is transcendental and my fav historical woman :)

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  31. Mel says:

    Two years ago I was presented with the rare (and quite illegal ;-)) opportunity to come as close as possible to the garves of Queen Anne and Queen Katherine as they rest in the chapel. After paying my sincere respects to the Beef Eater at the Tower for his duty as a veteran, he showed me his gratitude by allowing me to get in closer than is normally allowed, but only after I assured him I would not take pictures and I would keep a sense of decorum. I promised him I was there to pay my deepest respects to both women, who were at one point in history, sovereign queens of England, regardless of their fall from grace, which was not of their own making.

    It was a remarkable moment as I stood there, reading their names and somehow hoping that they know, wherever they are, their names are cleared and people still remember and honour them.

    Someday I hope to return to that same spot in the chapel and greet them once more.

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  32. shannon says:

    that was absolutely amazing you had that opportunity. I cant get enough of thie stories about her. i cant wait to one day visit this area. i wounder if there is viewing of where she was executed. I so wish her father could have been too :(
    i want to see where she had to wait in the tower. I would love to see the castle.

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  33. debs 1 says:

    I am beginning to think that cromwell was the arch villain. he and anne were in conflict hence survival of the fittest. he played a mastercard and maybe just maybe fooled henry who consequently was convinced of annes guilt. She has plagued me for almost half a century n am am still ‘seeking that shall not be found’ !!

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    Lady Brooke Reply:

    I agree with you, what was sad was that with her martyrdom they lost a huge supporter of the church of England thank god it was carried on.

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  34. Interesting thing to me about history is who writes it and why. They call Mary Tudor Bloody Mary and she killed 300, but Henry l0,000, from what I understand Why not Bloody Henry? . He was obsessed with his male heir business, so that his Tudor name should be preserved.He may have been delighted by Anne, because he couldn’t have her. She actually told him to pound sand. She was in love with Lord Percy, I think, and Wolsey, at the behest of Henry, sent him away. She was roped into that relationship, and did not want to be a trifle like her sister, Mary. She got to marry a psychopath.
    Interesting that his daughter, Elizabeth, never married. Why would you with a father like that? Everything is expedient to Henry. In his case, the means justify the end.
    Elizabeth was an incredible Queen, and I think it is interesting that she promises her hand to everyone, and gives it to no one. Her father taught her all she needed to know about dangerous marriages.

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  35. mcioffi says:

    Hi I was wondering if you could do cathrine of argons choker the onyx one but instead of in gold but in silver please get back to me I would love to have it just like that please let me know ASAP Michelle thanks

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  36. Julie says:

    I sometimes think of that Anne would have said if she knew, that Elizabeth would become when she grew up, I think she would have bursted with pride!

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  37. Vidya says:

    Please visit Hever castle, where Anne live as a child and King Henry visited her.
    It is exciting as well as a sad , when you walk in and around the castle . I will go back again because there is so much to se and think about

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  38. Ash says:

    Hi there,

    What I find most interesting is that Prof. George Bernard in his book ‘Fatal Attractions’ (2010), practically bases his opinion of Anne Boleyn, (which is quite degrading) on a poem/ letter by Lancelot de Carles, ‘A Letter Containing the Criminal Charges Laid Against Queen Anne Boleyn of England’. However, the quotes used here (which also appear in the poem/letter) by de Carles show none other than a high regard of respect for Anne.

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  39. Allison Croton says:

    Eustace Chapuys was an ardant enemy of Anne Boleyn and went out of his way to pass on gossip about that would invariably be third hand and therefore distorted. He was the biggest gossip monger at the court of Henry and refused to believe otherwise. He never met Anne so did not know her, he knew of her highly sophisticated education and that she was extraordinarily intellegent. He did come face to face with her on one occasion and felt obliged to bow in her presence. We must not forget that the role of the Ambassador was to pass on goings-on at whosever court they attended and what tall tales there were to tell. In this Chapuys was a past master, sometimes embelishing information to heighten sitiuations. This is an avenue worth exploring as to the thinking of Chapuys amd his motives.

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  40. susan says:

    Queen Anne was indeed a wonderful woman.i dreamed that I met her and she said

    ‘everything and everyone has their price.Mine was paid in blood and jewels,yet there are none so blind as those who cannot see.’

    I took this to mean that yes she was in it for the fame and fortune and wanted to be queen more than Henry’s wife ,yet she was either lied to or lied to herself and her naivety was taken advantage of.

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