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The Marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine Parr

Posted By on July 12, 2010

The Hampton Court Palace Catherine Parr in her wedding dress

On this day in history, the 12th July 1543, Henry VIII married the twice widowed Catherine Parr, Lady Latimer, at Hampton Court Palace. It was a private ceremony in the Queen’s Closet (private chapel) within the palace’s Chapel Royal and was attended by just twenty or so courtiers, including the King’s daughters, his niece, Margaret Douglas, the Duke and Duchess of Suffolk, the Countess of Hertford, Viscountess Lisle and Catherine’s sister and brother-in-law, Anne and William Herbert.

The marriage ceremony was performed by Stephen Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester, and Henry vowed to “have and to hold… for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, till death us depart” and his bride, Catherine, vowed “to be gentle and courteous, and buxom in bed and in board”! The wedding was followed by a special celebration breakfast and Catherine was proclaimed Queen of England. Unlike Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn, Catherine Parr was not crowned queen, she was, instead, proclaimed queen on the day of her marriage to Henry VIII.

You can find out more about Catherine Parr at:-

3 thoughts on “The Marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine Parr”

  1. Sarah says:

    I went to Hampton Court in November last year and saw this reenactment – it was brilliant!

  2. Eliza says:

    I also saw the reenactment in March!!! 🙂 It was funny, especially when Henry got angry!! They even mentioned Anne Boleyn (as a traitorous woman, who made the King suspicious of women).

  3. miladyblue says:

    Unlike many brides, that must have been the SCARIEST day of Catherine’s life. Most women of the era had to accept husbands they might not have known due to arranged marriages, but Catherine had to accept a husband who was only too well known and notorious for his treatment of wives in the past.

    Additionally, it is known Catherine was in love with Thomas Seymour, and in an eerie parallel to Anne Boleyn, Catherine’s true love was sent from court so that the King could have her instead.

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