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Literature from the Tudor Period
April 25, 2013
10:32 pm
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Esmeralda
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So, as I studied English at university it is safe to say I’m a bit of a literature geek, and this time period in literature (as well as history) is one of my absolute favourites. I also find you can learn quite a lot about what was happening at the time from literature. Anyone else love literature from the Tudor era? Obviously the Elizabethan era was an important one, with the like of Shakespeare and Marlowe, but there was some pretty cool stuff in Henry Viii’s time as well. I like Thomas Wyatt’s poetry and Thomas More’s ‘Utopia’ makes for an interesting, if heavy-going read. What literature from the period do you like/recommend, if any?

April 26, 2013
5:15 am
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Boleyn
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Esmeralda said

So, as I studied English at university it is safe to say I’m a bit of a literature geek, and this time period in literature (as well as history) is one of my absolute favourites. I also find you can learn quite a lot about what was happening at the time from literature. Anyone else love literature from the Tudor era? Obviously the Elizabethan era was an important one, with the like of Shakespeare and Marlowe, but there was some pretty cool stuff in Henry Viii’s time as well. I like Thomas Wyatt’s poetry and Thomas More’s ‘Utopia’ makes for an interesting, if heavy-going read. What literature from the period do you like/recommend, if any?

You lucky duck Esmeralda, I’ve always wanted to read a copy of Utopia, it does sound like it’s one of those books though that you have to read in little chunks and think about what More has written before going on to the next bit.
Love Tamberline by Marlowe. Shakespeare well what’s to say about a true master? I love A midsummer’s night dream the book and the play it’s just so funny. I love the swear words of the time too. I’ve recently been doing a lot of research into 15th and 16th century swear words and some of them are extremely creative. Who would have thought such innocuous (excuse Spelling) words would have been met with much horrified stares and shameful looks back then.
I don’t think I have a favourite as I feel they all have their own merits and talents. Next to Shakespeare of course for me it has to be Charles Dickens.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

April 26, 2013
8:43 am
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Esmeralda
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Yes, Utopia is difficult to get through at first. I wrote an essay on that and Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus (which I love love love) so got to know it in some detail. I focused on the second part of Utopia. That is the bit where it is actually based in the fictional ideal land and is a lot easier, and more fun, to read. I’d definitely recommend it but you certainly need to take your time to fully understand it and get the most out of reading it.

Shakespeare, I obviously love. I’m hoping to go see Twelfth Night and Taming of the Shrew next month so we’ll see. I think I like Marlowe even more though, and the stories surrounding his life are fascinating.

And, Charles Dickens is another love of mine. I’m a bit of a fan of Victorian history too, which is probably why they appeal so much, and I love that he was one of the first writers to write for and about the ‘working class’ and issues affecting them.

April 26, 2013
1:10 pm
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Anyanka
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Utopia is near the top of my current to read pile. I bought it for 99cents new from Amazon.

I’m trying to the Cnaterbury Tales at the moment in the Old English, it’s hard work when you are not used to it.

It's always bunnies.

April 26, 2013
2:01 pm
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Esmeralda
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Ah yes. Middle English (so Chaucer) can be tough, especially as there was no standardisation at that time. Are you reading alongside a translation? Student copies can be very useful too.

April 26, 2013
6:31 pm
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Sharon
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I had such a wonderful English teacher in high school. When I was graduating, I asked him to give me some titles of books about poetry. He surprised me by giving me three books filled with the poetry of the romance period, and he gave me a copy of The Complete Works of Christopher Marlowe. Needless to say I fell in love with the romance poets. We had studied Shakespeare and he knew I was a fan. He thought I would enjoy Marlowe. I now prefer Marlowe. I don’t have a favorite play, I enjoy them all. I still have the books Mr Glasgow gave me, and he has my undying gratitude for caring enough to give them to me.
I read Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Although it was hard and it took me a long time to finish, after I had completed it, I was very proud of myself. So keep plugging away at it, Anyanka. There was a student copy? Darn it!
I recently have read a few of Thomas Wyatt’s poems.

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