Did they have...? | Page 2 | Tudor Life and Times | Forum

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Did they have...?
January 6, 2012
9:25 pm
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 781
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

They must've been really itchy…Smile

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

January 7, 2012
8:17 pm
Avatar
Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 595
Member Since:
August 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

When did women start (and stop) plucking their hairlines in front to make their foreheads look larger? I'm thinking of that picture of Edward IV's queen, Elizabeth Woodville (Wydville):

 

Queen Elizabeth WoodvilleImage Enlarger

                        survivor ribbon                             

               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

January 7, 2012
10:49 pm
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 781
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

They did that too?

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

January 9, 2012
12:07 am
Avatar
Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 595
Member Since:
August 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Mya-Elise. said:

They did that too?

Oh yeah, people have been slaves to weird “fashion” choices for a very long time.

A species quirk. Wink

                        survivor ribbon                             

               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

January 9, 2012
6:51 am
Avatar
DuchessofBrittany
Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 846
Member Since:
June 7, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Women, through most of the middle ages, plucked their hairlines back. The fashion of the time was a high, rounded forehead. These same women would pluck their eyebrows into very thin lines in order to make their forheads larger. I can only imagine how painful this was, since I wince whenever I take on my eyebrows.

I found this website recently, and it's quite interesting. Although about medieval women, there could be some application to the Tudors! The link should take you to the section on beauty and hygiene.

 

http://rosaliegilbert.com/beau…..giene.html

"By daily proof you shall find me to be to you both loving and kind" Anne Boleyn

January 9, 2012
11:13 am
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 781
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Oh wow,yeah talk about flippin painful.

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

January 10, 2012
1:42 am
Avatar
Sophie1536
Lincolnshire UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 306
Member Since:
January 17, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

DuchessofBrittany, Thanx so much for posting the article as that has explained alot for me especially about how women viewed their monthly cycles and how they were dealt with as it's something that's puzzled me for a while.

I do wonder now when Mary thought she was with child it was down to the effect of her periods stopping through a strict religious life and possible poor diet that she was mistaken for a pregnancy.

Very interesting article Smile

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh144/nicksbabe28/Backstreet%20n%20Graffix/Image4-1.jpg

January 10, 2012
3:09 am
Avatar
Elliemarianna
Corsham, Wiltshire
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 316
Member Since:
June 7, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Maybe the reason Katherine Of Aragon had trouble with conceiving and pregnancy was because she used to fast a lot. Wasn't she warned to stop? Extreme deficiency can cause infant death…

"It is however but Justice, & my Duty to declre that this amiable Woman was entirely innocent of the Crimes with which she was accused, of which her Beauty, her Elegance, & her Sprightliness were sufficient proofs..." Jane Austen.

January 10, 2012
1:28 pm
Avatar
DuchessofBrittany
Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 846
Member Since:
June 7, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I seem to recall reading that KOA was warned to elimiate fasting and to eat (perhaps Tremlett's bio). I can only imagine how irregular eating could inhibit a woman's menstrual cycle, and harm any fetus she might carry.

Sophie, I've often wondered about where Mary I's menstrual problems stemmed from. I am not versed enough in her life to know if she was a frequent faster. I would suspect Mary suffered from high levels of stress, and that may have contributed to her issues with menstruation and fertility.

However, Elizabeth I also suffered from irregular periods, and subsequent concerns over feritility (not that she needed to be concerned). I know she was a light eater. So, not sure.

It seemed the Tudor diet was poor in general. They ate a lot of meat, little fruit and vegetables, and drank copious amounts of alcohol.  

"By daily proof you shall find me to be to you both loving and kind" Anne Boleyn

January 10, 2012
4:46 pm
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 781
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

First time I ever considered Katherine's eating problems to be a issue with her pregnancy problems was when Claire wrote the article about a possible eating disorder. I've actually spent alot of time researching the affects eating disorders have with issues with pregnancy and it seems to be the explanation for her. I could be wrong though.

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

January 10, 2012
4:47 pm
Avatar
Neil Kemp
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 447
Member Since:
April 11, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Duchess, the Tudor diet sounds like your average Saturday night out in most places in England today.Wink

January 10, 2012
4:53 pm
Avatar
Mya Elise
Ohio,US
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 781
Member Since:
May 16, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Smile

• Grumble all you like, this is how it’s going to be.

January 11, 2012
1:33 am
Avatar
Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 595
Member Since:
August 12, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Many thanks, Duchess!

                        survivor ribbon                             

               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

January 11, 2012
1:53 am
Avatar
Sophie1536
Lincolnshire UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 306
Member Since:
January 17, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Neil Kemp said:

Duchess, the Tudor diet sounds like your average Saturday night out in most places in England today.Wink

Oh Neil your post has made my day, haven't laughed so much in ages!

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh144/nicksbabe28/Backstreet%20n%20Graffix/Image4-1.jpg

January 11, 2012
3:02 am
Avatar
Louise
Hampshire, England
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 611
Member Since:
December 5, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
January 11, 2012
6:34 am
Avatar
DuchessofBrittany
Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 846
Member Since:
June 7, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Neil Kemp said:

Duchess, the Tudor diet sounds like your average Saturday night out in most places in England today.Wink

Neil…you got me again! Thanks for the laugh!

"By daily proof you shall find me to be to you both loving and kind" Anne Boleyn

January 11, 2012
7:29 am
Avatar
KrisTaDa
New Hampshire, USA
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 8
Member Since:
December 8, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I found this article and found it pretty informative. I dont usually agree with imposing 20th and 21st century ideas and motivations behind what people did in Tudor times, mostly because it was such a vast difference in the role church and government played in people's lives. However I found this article to be pretty well written and mainly focus on her religious reasons for fasting.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/hom…..oblem.html

"If the lion knew his own strength, hard were it for any man to rule him" -Thomas More

January 29, 2012
2:22 pm
Avatar
Melissa
New York City
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 162
Member Since:
July 9, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

There is a condition sometimes called “holy anorexia” that some people believe affected medieval mystics like Catherine of Siena-essentially, fasting becomes addictive. It’s entirely possible Katherine and Mary suffered from it. However, wasn’t Katherine of Aragon supposed to be rather plump? Personally, my period stops if my weight drops below 107 lbs. I have to be careful not to let my weight drop because lack of a period leads to osteopenia. So for me, it’s not about eating or not eating but about actual bodyweight. So who knows.

Ainsi sera, groigne qui groigne.

January 29, 2012
3:04 pm
Avatar
DuchessofBrittany
Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 846
Member Since:
June 7, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I recently finished Tremlett’s bio on Catherine, and he mentioned several times about her eating habits, especially during the stressful years after Arthur’s death. Tremlett noted that her weight dropped, espcially given her perfectionist inclinations. It seemed she was unable to handle food, and given the circumstances of her life, I would be sick all the time. As for her plump figure, it came later in life after years of pregnancies.

"By daily proof you shall find me to be to you both loving and kind" Anne Boleyn

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 214

Currently Online:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Anyanka: 2337

Boleyn: 2285

Sharon: 2115

Bella44: 933

DuchessofBrittany: 846

Mya Elise: 781

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 427746

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 13

Topics: 1713

Posts: 23079

Newest Members:

albakl4, Michaelfen, RamonTuP, LonnieMef, FSUimance, Lefferttault

Administrators: Claire: 959