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Death Penalty, Torture and Punishment
August 5, 2011
12:46 am
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Sophie1536
Lincolnshire UK
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The death penalty, torture and general punishment were without doubt a way of life in Tudor and Elizabethan.

Just wondered how often anything took place like this in England as it's something I've never read up on.

How often were executions taking place? Was it a daily occurrence?, weekly? and how many people?

Some of the torture methods used were beyond shocking but it seems the norm in those times, did people just accept this was normal?

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh144/nicksbabe28/Backstreet%20n%20Graffix/Image4-1.jpg

August 8, 2011
9:03 pm
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Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
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I think executions were commonplace, weekly maybe. And I think torturing a confession from prisoners was accepted. The legal system back then was very different. The burden of proof was on the defendant to prove their innocence instead of today's presumption of innocence. But punishment for crimes that didn't call for the death sentence were very harsh, too.

Some links:

http://www.buzzle.com/articles…..-ages.html

http://www.the-tudors.org.uk/c…..tudors.htm

http://www.woodlands-junior.ke…../other.htm

                        survivor ribbon                             

               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

August 9, 2011
10:34 am
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Elliemarianna
Corsham, Wiltshire
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I think executions were very common, and entertaining (The Tudor version of taking the family to the movies for the weekend).

People born into the Tudor period were constantly surrounded by death – If you survived your first years, you were likely to die from some horrible illness or disease, giving birth or some violent, bloody death. You were lucky if you died of old age. With this in mind, I think people accepted death as perfectly commonplace in their lives – hence the deeply religious interest – I believe as far as they were concerned, this life didn't matter, it was the afterlife that counted, so they concentrated much of their energy on death. In this respect, executions were just another way to die, and the deep interest and curiosity of death drew crowds of people to watch out of gory fascination.

"It is however but Justice, & my Duty to declre that this amiable Woman was entirely innocent of the Crimes with which she was accused, of which her Beauty, her Elegance, & her Sprightliness were sufficient proofs..." Jane Austen.

August 17, 2011
1:25 pm
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LimeyMcMac
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I think executions were very common, and entertaining (The Tudor version of taking the family to the movies for the weekend).
People born into the Tudor period were constantly surrounded by death – If you survived your first years, you were likely to die from some horrible illness or disease, giving birth or some violent, bloody death. You were lucky if you died of old age. With this in mind, I think people accepted death as perfectly commonplace in their lives – hence the deeply religious interest – I believe as far as they were concerned, this life didn’t matter, it was the afterlife that counted, so they concentrated much of their energy on death. In this respect, executions were just another way to die, and the deep interest and curiosity of death drew crowds of people to watch out of gory fascination.

August 17, 2011
1:42 pm
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Elliemarianna
Corsham, Wiltshire
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LimeyMcMac said:

I think executions were very common, and entertaining (The Tudor version of taking the family to the movies for the weekend).

People born into the Tudor period were constantly surrounded by death – If you survived your first years, you were likely to die from some horrible illness or disease, giving birth or some violent, bloody death. You were lucky if you died of old age. With this in mind, I think people accepted death as perfectly commonplace in their lives – hence the deeply religious interest – I believe as far as they were concerned, this life didn't matter, it was the afterlife that counted, so they concentrated much of their energy on death. In this respect, executions were just another way to die, and the deep interest and curiosity of death drew crowds of people to watch out of gory fascination.


Lol?

"It is however but Justice, & my Duty to declre that this amiable Woman was entirely innocent of the Crimes with which she was accused, of which her Beauty, her Elegance, & her Sprightliness were sufficient proofs..." Jane Austen.

August 17, 2011
7:51 pm
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Anyanka
La Belle Province
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Quote problem I think elliemarianna.

It's always bunnies.

August 17, 2011
7:54 pm
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Impish_Impulse
US Midwest
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That's weird, Ellie.

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               "Don't knock at death's door. 

          Ring the bell and run. He hates that."    

August 18, 2011
4:22 pm
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Elliemarianna
Corsham, Wiltshire
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Impish_Impulse said:

That's weird, Ellie.


Haha I know, about the comment though – I couldnt of said it better myself… oh I did!

"It is however but Justice, & my Duty to declre that this amiable Woman was entirely innocent of the Crimes with which she was accused, of which her Beauty, her Elegance, & her Sprightliness were sufficient proofs..." Jane Austen.

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