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What Are We All Reading?
April 22, 2010
12:31 pm
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Bella44
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I'm not sure about anyone else here but I am a complete book geek, there I said it!  I love all kinds of books, history, biographies, thrillers, historical novels, classic literature, fantasy/supernatural to children's classics so I was wondering what everyone else was reading at the moment?

I'm half-way through 'The Last Boleyn' by Karen Harper, an historical novel of Mary Boleyn.  So far I think I like her Mary better than Philippa Gregory's even though Gregory perhaps developed Marys character a little more.  Hope that made some sort of sense! 

April 22, 2010
12:52 pm
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Sharon
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I read The Last Boleyn, and enjoyed it.  I love Mary.  From what I have read she was always a fun loving girl.  I like that about her. 

I just finished reading, The Queen's Mistake, by, Diana Haeger.  It's a novel about Catherine Howard.  I thoroughly enjoyed it.  I would love to believe Catherine and Thomas were in love before she married Henry.  That's what this book conveys.  Sweet.

I just started another novel by Vanora Bennett called The Queen's Lover.  It is the story of Catherine of Valois,  wife of Henry V,  mother of Henry VI, grandmother of Henry ViI, and great grandmother of HenryVIII.  The woman who began the Tudor dynasty. 

Every once in a while I have to read fiction and get away from non-fiction.

April 23, 2010
12:23 am
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wreckmasterjay
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Am half way through a book called Lady Jane Grey – Nine Days Queen, cant remember the author. And after that I have Catherine Howard to read before returning them to the library and getting stuck into my fave author Clive Cussler. The story of Lady Jane Grey is one of fascinating and tragic circumstances. You cant help feeling sorry  for her!

Everyone remembers a hero.

April 23, 2010
5:05 pm
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Sabrina
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Ok.. Honestly I'm reading textbooks for school (History of Ancient Greece). But I'm also reading on the side The Collected Works of Elizabeth I (it's a good read, with LOTS of her letters and such), and I'm going to read Eclipse again, as the movie is coming out and I want to refresh my memory.

I'm also reading alot of mythology anthologies, as I want to add the information to my big brain. LOL Between Photoshop projects and remembering which philosopher said what, I'm trying.. Wink

Let not my enemies sit as my jury

April 23, 2010
5:43 pm
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HannahL
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The books everyone's reading sound good!  I have so much I want to read all the time.  Bella44, you're not alone in being a “book geek.”  Right now I'm reading “The Red Queen's Daughter” by a Russian author whose name escapes me.  It's about Mary Seymour, Katherine Parr's daughter, assuming that she lived to be a teenager.  She grows to be a white magician at Elizabeth's court and is fighting mystical powers of evil to uncover the truth about her past and protect Elizabeth.  Strange but I'm enjoying it.

April 23, 2010
8:16 pm
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Bella44
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Good to know I'm not the only book lover out there!  And I'm with you Sharon – I have to take a break from non-fiction every so often too!  The one about Mary Seymour sounds really interesting, kind of a 'what-if' with lots of mystical elements thrown in!  And Catherine Howards and Lady Jane Greys stories I think are always just as compelling and tragic as Anne Boleyns.

Sabrina – studying Ancient Greece for school would be cool, I took classics for one year in high school but absolutely hated the teacher so I hope your teachers/lecturers are a heck of a lot better than mine!

April 23, 2010
9:07 pm
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Sabrina
California
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My teacher is pretty awesome.. He's not all stuffy and the like. He swears, he puts things in terms to make you understand it better. It is very interesting to learn where most of our cultures got their ideas..

Let not my enemies sit as my jury

April 24, 2010
1:53 am
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Hannah
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Ian Mortimer, The Perfect King. A biography of Edward III.

Be daly prove you shalle me fynde,nTo be to you bothe lovyng and kynde,

April 25, 2010
1:28 am
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Claire
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Just finishing G W Bernard's “Anne Boleyn: Fatal Attractions” and I'm also reading “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest” by Stieg Larsson, the third book in his Millenium trilogy, it's wonderful.

Debunking the myths about Anne Boleyn

April 25, 2010
2:43 pm
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Beth
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I'm currently (still) reading The Autobiography of Henry VIII by Margaret George. I have a whole pile of books left over from Christmas and birthday to get through but I think the next one on my list will be Skulduggery Pleasant: Dark Days by Derek Landy. The Skulduggery books are mostly written for kids but they're so quirky and sarcastic, I love them!

June 4, 2010
12:44 am
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wreckmasterjay
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Read the first part of David Starkey's “Henry” which was really good. Short chapters and lots of info, just how I like it! A friend of mine lent me it but I would be very interested in reading part two.

I'd recommend anything by this guy as he really seems to know his Tudors!

Everyone remembers a hero.

June 4, 2010
12:59 am
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Gentillylace
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I'm currently reading three books about Catherine Howard: A Tudor Tragedy by Lacey Baldwin Smith, Katheryn the Wanton Queen by Maureen Peters and The Rose Without a Thorn by Jean Plaidy. Baldwin Smith's book is quite useful but a little dry: the two novels complement each other nicely, but I don't think that either will be as wonderful as Alisa Libby's The King's Rose. For my spiritual reading, I am finishing up The Newman Reader, a selection of Cardinal Newman's works in various genres, and hope soon to start on his Apologia pro Vita Sua. Very good, but not light reading.

Yours as long as lyffe endures, Katheryn

June 4, 2010
2:18 am
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wreckmasterjay
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I actually find a lot of books about Tudor people a bit hard to read. There is a lot of personalities that some authors only write their last names so you have to keep going back to find out who they are on about. Also confusing when they just mention first names like Henry and you have no idea which one they are referring to!!

Still good reads though although havent read any of yours Gentillylace. Let me know which you think are best!

Everyone remembers a hero.

June 5, 2010
11:53 am
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TinaII2None
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Laugh *raising hand* Total book geek too (and movie geek as well). As far as what I'm reading: a friend gave me the most current translation of Tolstoy's War and Peace for Christmas, and I finally decided to take it on! (It was on my Amazon wish list, so it's not like she pulled the book out of thin air). I had read Anna Karenina and The Brothers Karamazov by the same translators, and figured that it was time I take on one of the biggest epic novels of all time. I'm 100 pages into it, and thoroughly enjoying it, and thanks to having seen the 1960's Soviet production that runs about 9 hours; the 1970's BBC miniseries, and the 1950's movie, I know all the characters and situations (which helps).

If I need to take a break from “everything Russian,” my free copy of Lady in the Tower just arrived from my new membership to the Book of the Month Club2. I may not be able to resist my new Tudor book.

I'd love to start reading Karen Harper again — it's been awhile since I read any of the books in her Elizabeth Mystery series. And that Red Queen's Daughter that HannahL mentioned sounds interesting. Honestly, I haven't read a book of Tudor fiction since Alison Weir's novel on Elizabeth, and I'm afraid that reading ONE book by Philippa Gregory was enough (a Scottish friend sent me the one about Elizabeth and Dudley as a gift, and the author's portrayal of Elizabeth seemed so far off the mark IMO that I've avoided anything else she's written…although her latest about Margaret Beaufort sounds interesting).

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 5, 2010
11:56 am
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TinaII2None
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Beth said:I'm currently (still) reading The Autobiography of Henry VIII by Margaret George. I have a whole pile of books left over from Christmas and birthday to get through but I think the next one on my list will be Skulduggery Pleasant: Dark Days by Derek Landy. The Skulduggery books are mostly written for kids but they're so quirky and sarcastic, I love them!


I read The Autobiography of Henry VIII ages ago. What section are you on right now and what do you think of it up to whatever point you're at?

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 5, 2010
12:12 pm
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Beth
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TinaII2None said:

I read The Autobiography of Henry VIII ages ago. What section are you on right now and what do you think of it up to whatever point you're at?


Hi 🙂 I'm up to Catherine Parr, so not long to go now. I like it in general, but there are parts of it that bug me. I still find it incredibly hard to like Henry though! I will finish it one day!

June 5, 2010
12:51 pm
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TinaII2None
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Yeah, there were parts that bugged me too from what I remember, and a few that made me cringe. I kept having to remind myself over and over again that this is from Henry's POV so of course things might be slightly…biased? Prejudiced? One-sided? There are scenes I still vividly recall but won't go into detail so I don't spoil anything. Wink

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 5, 2010
1:00 pm
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Beth
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Hehe, thanks I appreciate that 🙂

I read in your earlier post that you got put off Philippa Gregory from just one book. Was it The Virgin's Lover by any chance? That's the only book of hers I've read and didn't like. I recommend The Other Boleyn Girl  even though it's full of inaccuracies. It really sucks you in to court life. Also The Constant Princess, which gave me a greater respect for Katherine of Aragon. That is if you ever feel inclined to read Philippa Gregory again!

June 5, 2010
1:10 pm
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TinaII2None
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Beth said:

Hehe, thanks I appreciate that 🙂

I read in your earlier post that you got put off Philippa Gregory from just one book. Was it The Virgin's Lover by any chance? That's the only book of hers I've read and didn't like. I recommend The Other Boleyn Girl  even though it's full of inaccuracies. It really sucks you in to court life. Also The Constant Princess, which gave me a greater respect for Katherine of Aragon. That is if you ever feel inclined to read Philippa Gregory again!


THAT would be the one! Elizabeth just came off as needy, weak, indecisive and a few other things. I finished it, but wasn't happy with it. When I later found out that Ms. Gregory disliked Anne Boleyn (or so I've heard), I just figured she was taking that dislike in another direction by striking out at Anne's daughter by making her nothing like the Elizabeth we've known. I've seen the movie version of The Other Boleyn Girl; haven't read the book although I had heard of it when it was first released, and thought it had an interesting premise. The Constant Princess sounds good, and like I mentioned, her new release about Lady Margaret Beaufort may be interesting too (I've always had a fascination with that lady). LOL about you saying “…if you ever feel inclined to read Philippa Gregory again!” Yeah, that's a fact. Laugh

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

June 5, 2010
1:31 pm
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TinaII2None
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Since many of us either are currently tackling books about the Tudors or have in the past, I'm wondering if any of you have read these:

Crown in Candlelight by Rosemary Jarmin — the fictionalized story of the lives of Katherine of Valois and Owen Tudor. I found this book back in the Seventies through a second-hand book catalog and bought it without knowing much about it at first. I not only fell in love with Wales, but with the whole Welsh side of the Tudors. The final scene with Owen Tudor still chokes me up.

The Nonsuch Lure by Mary M. Luke — I was familiar with Ms. Luke because I had read her Tudor non-fiction trilogy when I was in high school (Catherine the Queen; A Crown for Elizabeth; Gloriana). This one has a bit of everything — reincarnation and regression hypnotism, Henry VIII, a missing object belonging to Catherine of Aragon, a portrait by Holbein, a silver-haired beauty, curses from beyond the grave, and how it all ties into Henry's fabulous Nonsuch Palace. I still own the (pristine) paperback copy I bought back in the Seventies, and every 5 years or so, I pull it out and reread it. Elizabeth has a cameo appearance and Henry makes a larger than life but brief one too.

The Ivy Crown by Mary M. Luke — this is her novel about Katherine Parr, my second favorite of Henry's wives, from childhood until her untimely death.

 I, Elizabeth by Rosalind Miles — about…well duh. LOL I read this years ago and I can't really remember anything specific that I liked or disliked. Not sure what that means but after reading over some reviews on Amazon, they may have hit the nail on the head as to why it's not completely memorable.

I've also read Weir's The Lady Elizabeth and own (but haven't yet read) her Innocent Traitor; The Autobiography of Henry VIII; the first 3 books in Karen Harper's Elizabeth Mystery series; and bought something called The Tudor Rose at a book sale — thought it was going to be about Mary Rose (Henry's sister), but turned out to be about Elizabeth of York instead! Had mixed feelings about that one.

Henry: Mistress Anne, will you teach the king of England how they dance in the French court?
Anne: There is nothing that France can teach England, your majesty.
King Henry VIII: Well said. Well said.
– Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

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