A thought about why Henry grew to hate Anne | Page 3 | Henry VIII | Forum

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
A thought about why Henry grew to hate Anne
August 27, 2011
5:24 pm
Avatar
Milady12
Sweet Home Chicago
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 41
Member Since:
August 27, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think he grew bored of her and bored of the turmoil. Once you are bored with someone…it's over. That is the number 1 destroyer of relationships…not lack of love…boredom. That comes first…the loss of love follows. After that … regret. I think it was during the regret stage the hatred came. Henry was not a man who stands accountable for his actions. He always found someone to blame. So he looks at the deplorable things he did in the name of his love for Anne and then he lays it all on her doorstep. The death of Katherine, His estrangement from Mary, the Estrangement and possibly the death of Wolsey, Certainly the death of Thomas More, Cardinal Fisher, etc., etc., etc.,. In his loopy little mind he probably felt that he could send her to a convent and be rid of her and also be a laughingstock ….OOOORRRRR….he could kill her and symbolically CLEANSE himself of all the SIN she brought on him with her “witchy wiles”! Can't you just hear the choir of angels singing in his deranged little mind? And who better to take to wife than the serene pious fair maiden Jane Seymour? Thereby giving him the loving peace of being back in God's good graces and the admiration of his people. <snort> What a jackanapes!

Kimberly

September 30, 2011
8:40 am
Avatar
E
Member
Banned
Forum Posts: 256
Member Since:
May 19, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Perhaps he did not grow to hate her? Maybe the end of their relationship came as a complete shock to him (thoroughly believing Cromwell's lies) and he was devastated- vindictive and devastated…

Perhaps he came to realise Anne's innocence, perhaps this realisation played a part in Cromwell's downfall. I have heard it said that Henry never spoke Anne's name again. Do you think the differences between Anne Boleyn and Anne of Cleve's was a factor in his dislike of the later? Hmmm…

"A fresh young damsel, who could trip and go"

October 1, 2011
1:10 pm
Avatar
Elliemarianna
Corsham, Wiltshire
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 316
Member Since:
June 7, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I've always wondered if Jane turned Henry against Anne too. She was one of her ladies – what if she lied, telling Henry she was entertaining men in her rooms? Cromwell noticed and jumped on the opportunity to save his skin… Didn't Jane openly oppose Anne? Paying her no court and being haughty towards her?

I read somewhere, not 100% sure where, that after Anne had Elizabeth, Henry never looked at her with the same eyes again?

I think it was a combination of things that turned Henry against Anne, but I think he loved her AND hated her equally. I think he always felt passion towards Anne, but Jane cooled this passion and made his life more bearable. She turned him against Anne, turned his passion to fiery hatred. He believed the charges because Jane, playing the angel who rescued him from a eternity in hell, told him they were true. In his eyes, Jane could give him a son, she was pure, virtuous and obedient… God sent her to Henry to show him the way, to give him an heir to continue his God given right of rule. Anne was a witch, who used Henry's passion for her to control and manipulate him! She fornicated with others! She deserved her death in his eyes! So he destroys her image, purges himself of her for good, denies she ever existed. But every time he looked into Elizabeth's eyes, there was Anne, staring back at him.

Anne was the best thing that ever happened to him, and the country!

"It is however but Justice, & my Duty to declre that this amiable Woman was entirely innocent of the Crimes with which she was accused, of which her Beauty, her Elegance, & her Sprightliness were sufficient proofs..." Jane Austen.

October 3, 2011
12:38 am
Avatar
Sophie1536
Lincolnshire UK
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 306
Member Since:
January 17, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

It's said love and hate are the same thing so maybe Henry loved her and hated her equally…..who knows Wink

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh144/nicksbabe28/Backstreet%20n%20Graffix/Image4-1.jpg

October 3, 2011
4:05 am
Avatar
Anne fan
Leicestershire
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 123
Member Since:
February 10, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The evidence in early 1536 is that Henry and Anne were 'merry' together. That doesn't sound like he hated her at that point. 

 

Also, there's all the obsession with the Calais swordsman rather than the normal axe-wielding executioner.

 

I think all the comments about Henry being obsessed with Anne are correct. Anne herself caused a problem when she argued with Norris to such an extent that she had to get him to swear she was a 'good woman' in front of a priest. Henry was obviously angry and suspicious – there's the account of Anne holding up Elizabeth to Henry at a window which seems to fit in with this event.

 

I still think Cromwell brought Anne down as a result of factional politics. He played on Henry's suspicions, which Anne had caused, and made Henry think there was something in it. I can see Henry would be shocked, I can see he would hate her for a short while. In this case for the few weeks it took to try and execute her. But I don't think there was a long-term hatred there.

 

Henry's crime was not intervening, not questionning – allowing himself to think the worst instead of logically querying what was going on.  He hardly ever spoke of her again so I wonder just how much regret there was simmering away underneath?

October 3, 2011
4:21 am
Avatar
Elliemarianna
Corsham, Wiltshire
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 316
Member Since:
June 7, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Anne fan said:

The evidence in early 1536 is that Henry and Anne were 'merry' together. That doesn't sound like he hated her at that point. 

 

Also, there's all the obsession with the Calais swordsman rather than the normal axe-wielding executioner.

 

I think all the comments about Henry being obsessed with Anne are correct. Anne herself caused a problem when she argued with Norris to such an extent that she had to get him to swear she was a 'good woman' in front of a priest. Henry was obviously angry and suspicious – there's the account of Anne holding up Elizabeth to Henry at a window which seems to fit in with this event.

 

I still think Cromwell brought Anne down as a result of factional politics. He played on Henry's suspicions, which Anne had caused, and made Henry think there was something in it. I can see Henry would be shocked, I can see he would hate her for a short while. In this case for the few weeks it took to try and execute her. But I don't think there was a long-term hatred there.

 

Henry's crime was not intervening, not questionning – allowing himself to think the worst instead of logically querying what was going on.  He hardly ever spoke of her again so I wonder just how much regret there was simmering away underneath?

I agree! I personally think Henry did believe the charges, and Jane was a rebound. Henry was paranoid all the time, it would be easy to add small suggestions and for him make a big deal of it.

"It is however but Justice, & my Duty to declre that this amiable Woman was entirely innocent of the Crimes with which she was accused, of which her Beauty, her Elegance, & her Sprightliness were sufficient proofs..." Jane Austen.

October 18, 2011
6:13 am
Avatar
E
Member
Banned
Forum Posts: 256
Member Since:
May 19, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Yesss. If only one person had had the balls to say to Henry: “Erm. Excuse me? Have you not noticed Sire, that the Queen, your entirely beloved wife, was in a different county than these men, when the crimes where said to be committed? Idiot?” “Oh, and also that the Queen, your Grace's entirely beloved wife, has quarrelled with Cromwell, about huge sums of money and, I'm sorry, who is bringing this 'evidence' to your attention? Moron?”

I would have been nice if someone had brought the truth to Henry and just left it for him to read. Although, maybe this did happen, just not in time to save her. I believe that sometime before the fall of Cromwell, Henry knew he had done the wrong thing by Anne.

"A fresh young damsel, who could trip and go"

November 19, 2011
1:09 pm
Avatar
bree
USA
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 8
Member Since:
November 19, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

At the end of the day, I'm beginning to believe he hated her because she was smarter than he was.  She was strongly religious and political, and he never allowed a wife again who attempted to be involved in the affairs of state.  Even KoA was passive in politics.  It just makes me wonder.

November 25, 2011
9:53 am
Avatar
229bluebell
portsmoth
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 11
Member Since:
October 17, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

i think Henry loved the chase once he court his prey weather it be a deer or a wife he got bored and with bordem comes dislike which in turn turns to hate. With all his freinds turning against her all was lost ,and so for Henry the chase was on again. Its so sad to think that at the wime of a man a wife could lose her life Cry

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 214

Currently Online:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Anyanka: 2337

Boleyn: 2285

Sharon: 2115

Bella44: 933

DuchessofBrittany: 846

Mya Elise: 781

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 427592

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 13

Topics: 1712

Posts: 23076

Newest Members:

DennisDorie, vitushatault, oghmaniusVom, Urocchxae, Puimignog, Emma3456

Administrators: Claire: 959