Any good non-fiction Tudor books? | Book Club | Forum

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Any good non-fiction Tudor books?
February 17, 2014
7:56 pm
Avatar
Avarice
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 14
Member Since:
February 16, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Does anybody have any good non-fiction books on the Plantagenets or the Tudors that they would recommend?
I’ve read so much historical fiction that my mind is fuzzing the facts together so I can’t always remember what’s really happened and what was embellished by the authors!

I’d really appreciate it, thanks! (:

February 17, 2014
9:48 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Yeah, that happens. Have you only read fiction?
The Life and Death of Anne Boleyn, by Eric Ives. That’s my bible when it comes to questions about Anne.
Elizabeth Norton has written bio’s on all the wives except Katherine of Aragon, I think.. She also has a book about Bessie Blount.
Catherine Howard, by Lacy Baldwin Smith
Katherine of Aragon, by Giles Tremlett
I have not read it yet: The Plantagenet’s, by Dan Jones
Six Wives, by David Starkey, and Henry, Virtuous Prince
Mary Boleyn by Alison Weir
Jane Boleyn by Julia Fox
Tudors by J G Myers
The Winter King, by Thomas Penn (Henry VII)
That’s a few to get you started.

February 18, 2014
10:35 pm
Avatar
Bill1978
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 476
Member Since:
April 9, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Edward VI: The Lost King Of England – Chris Skidmore
Lady Jane Grey: A Tudor Mystery – Eric Ives
Tudor: The Family Story – Leana De Lisle
The Sisters Who Would Be Queen: The Tragedy of Mary, Katherine and Lady Jane Grey – Leanda de Lisle

After watching The White Queen series, I searched out the following for Wars Of The Roses biographies most were recommended from here

Elizabeth Woodville: The Mother of the Princes in the Tower – David Baldwin
Richard III – David Baldwin
Edward IV – Charles Ross

I also plan to get

Anne Neville: Richard III’s Tragic Queen by Amy Licence when it comes out in paperback to help complete my York King and Queen series.

And there is a book coming out in March called:

The Third Plantagenet: George Duke Of Clarence, Richard III”s Brother by John Ashdown-Hill

that I plan to purchase, to help me with my stageplay that is stuck in my head

I also have every Alison Weir book on the Tudor dynasty and the 2 on the Wars Of The Roses period (and plan to get her one of Elizabeth of York). But I admit I can’t really recommend them as they are more to just look pretty and complete on the shelves and I haven’t read them yet. LOL

February 19, 2014
12:01 am
Avatar
Avarice
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 14
Member Since:
February 16, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Wow these are fantastic, thank you both!! I’ve read non-fiction and studied it in High School but it was a few years back now and my mind has been muddled with dozens of fiction on the era since then! I’ll add all of these to my To Read list! Thanks again (:

February 19, 2014
2:14 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I’ve just brought The Tudor Queen, by Anna Hickson. I’ve not read it yet so I can’t tell you if it’s good or bad. from the cover it’s about Catherine of Valois.
Currently reading the constant Princess by SWMNBN, as her books go (and we all know how her books go from being funny ha ha to funny peculiar, to downright pants at the drop of a hat.) this one isn’t too bad. I guess her brain must have been fully charged to help her to think straight to write it.
Olga you can breathe a sigh of relief this book won’t be used for anything other than reading. :)

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

February 23, 2014
7:45 pm
Avatar
Avarice
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 14
Member Since:
February 16, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Boleyn said

I’ve just brought The Tudor Queen, by Anna Hickson. I’ve not read it yet so I can’t tell you if it’s good or bad. from the cover it’s about Catherine of Valois.
Currently reading the constant Princess by SWMNBN, as her books go (and we all know how her books go from being funny ha ha to funny peculiar, to downright pants at the drop of a hat.) this one isn’t too bad. I guess her brain must have been fully charged to help her to think straight to write it.
Olga you can breathe a sigh of relief this book won’t be used for anything other than reading. :)

I’ll look in to that one too! Thank you!

I found the Constant Princess quite a good read! Are you planning on reading the rest of the Tudor series by PG?
I found The Other Queen particularly insightful. I hadn’t known of Bess of Hardwick before reading this book.

February 24, 2014
11:02 am
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have all of SWMNBN Tudor books, well all bar one. (The Virgin’s Lover) I did have it, but I gave it to the boys (Chipmunks) to read, and they enjoyed it throughly (Much to Olga’s disgust) and I believe Janet gave her copy to her brother’s to use for target practise. I could’nt get on with The Other Queen. IMO, SWMNBN seemed to somehow lose her way in writing it. Good old Bess of Hardwick she was a very tough wily old bird.

Of all of SWMNBN books I must admit I do like the Red and White Queen’s books, I going to get her White Princess book like to see how she’s to portray or slaughter Lizzy of York.

I must admit I’m very partial to Jean Plaidy’s books my favourite there being The Thistle and the Rose.
The trouble is that reading historical fiction books can cloud your mind somewhat in believing what is written/read is the whole truth of the matter, so I tend to read a few fictional novels and then balance them out with factual novels i find weighing up the two interpretations can kind of get you to the truth of the real person that you have read about in both genres.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

February 24, 2014
6:55 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I recently read an article about historical fiction. It said that if you are going to read fiction, that’s great; but right next to the fiction book, should be the nonfiction history. I couldn’t agree more. That’s what got me interested in history in the first place. It sure didn’t happen in school. Years ago I read a book called Fortune Made His Sword. It was about Henry V. Right after that I read Katherine by Anya Seton. I noticed how the two books spoke of the same people, but the dates and times and some of the stories didn’t match up. That’s when I bought my first nonfiction history book. It was a general history of England, but it was the beginning for me. After that, I started buying nonfiction. I read fiction, but then I check my history books for the facts.

February 24, 2014
7:26 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

That’s exactly what I do Sharon. That’s what I meant when I mentioned SWMNBN books to you.. her historical facts are completely muddled sometimes, but when you’ve read it you want to find out the truth so you then go and find a factual book about the person you have just read about.
When I was school history was something I found annoying, it wasn’t so much the subject matter it was the way the teacher taught it. Basically it was “there’s a book read it.” and you weren’t allowed to question what was in it, even if you knew what was written was wrong. Basically the book was right and that was that.
Which again is the good thing about fiction and non fiction books it teaches us to question what we have read.
which is where this foru is all good for us because we have our own opinions about genres in history and one of us actually ight of hit on the truth somewhere along the line when we offer our opinions.
Louise’s opinion is certainly very interesting when it comes to George B as is Claire R’s opinion Anne B.
I’m sure if we collected together all our opinions and wrote them all down in a book, we would probably somewhere pretty close to what these our forebares were really like. Although my opinions of old stinky wobble bum, would probably get censored out if it was published. LOL :)

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

February 24, 2014
8:07 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I’m not sure how Henry would turn out with our opinions of him, Boleyn. Somewhere between Lard arse and “No, I’m not giving him credit for that.” I don’t think he would end up as Bluff King Hal.

February 24, 2014
8:14 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I can only think that the page with our opinions about Lard arse would be something like this Henry was a B****** Wife murdering C***
Lots of B, C, D, F, with lots 0f pretty stars, squiggles and angry smilies..

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

February 24, 2014
8:23 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Avarice,
Boleyn has just reminded me of three more books;
The First Queen of England by Linda Porter
Mary Tudor by Anne Whitelock
Mary Tudor by David Baldwin

Boleyn, Smile

February 24, 2014
8:57 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I can recommend Anna Whitlocks book I found it extremely interesting. Changed my perception of Mary Tulip for sure. She just tried to do the best she thought for a her people, but because of her stubborn refusal to move with the times she screwed things up badly..

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

February 24, 2014
9:24 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Avarice said

Boleyn said

I’ve just brought The Tudor Queen, by Anna Hickson. I’ve not read it yet so I can’t tell you if it’s good or bad. from the cover it’s about Catherine of Valois.
Currently reading the constant Princess by SWMNBN, as her books go (and we all know how her books go from being funny ha ha to funny peculiar, to downright pants at the drop of a hat.) this one isn’t too bad. I guess her brain must have been fully charged to help her to think straight to write it.
Olga you can breathe a sigh of relief this book won’t be used for anything other than reading. :)

I’ll look in to that one too! Thank you!

I found the Constant Princess quite a good read! Are you planning on reading the rest of the Tudor series by PG?
I found The Other Queen particularly insightful. I hadn’t known of Bess of Hardwick before reading this book.

Bess was instrumental in bringing up her grandaughter Arabella Stewart. King Jimbo 1st imprisoned Arabella as she was his cousin, and saw her as a threat to his throne. Coupled with the fact that she had secretly (without Permission) married Thomas Seymour, the son of Katherine Grey by Edward Seymour son of Edward Seymour, Queen Jane Seymour’s brother. Arabella’s mother and Father being Elizabeth Hardwick, and Charles Stewart (Lord Darnley’s brother, and King Jimbo 1st dad) Bess was a extremely business like woman, she knew what she wanted and she got it, too.
Arabella’s story however was quite sad. She died in the tower , her husband did escape abroad, and I believe he married either a French or Italian nobel woman, after Arabella died.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

February 25, 2014
9:53 am
Avatar
Olga
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 766
Member Since:
October 28, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Loades or Baldwin for the Mary Tudor book Sharon?

Although I will add I recommend anything by Baldwin, I have all of his books here, I have yet to read the one on Elizabeth Woodville though.

Avarice –
Anne of Cleves (my favourite girl) by Elizabeth Norton.
Antonia Fraser – Six Wives as well. That book is a bit dated but worth a read, fantastic Anne of Cleves section.
Henry VIII by John Matusiak, if you loathe Henry as much as I do. Not many wives in that one though.
Henry VIII, both books by Robert Hutchinson.
Boleyn Women by Elizabeth Norton. Must read.

I can’t even begin on the Plantagenets. Dan Jones doesn’t seem to be my cup of tea. Actually I am not big on “overview” books I prefer bios and straight military histories, even of military history bores holes in my brain.

I am probably going to look at Ian Mortimers books for Bolingbroke/Henry IV, Henry V and Edward III.
All of Bill’s recommendations are great books. Michael Hicks also has one on George Plantagenet but it is killing me (very dry), the Ashdown-Hill book on George was really good. Josephine Wilkinson’s Princes in the Tower, the most comprehensive on that topic.

Anything in Yale English monarchs is supposed to be excellent, I have both Charles Ross’ book on Edward IV and Richard III. I also have some others I have not read, I am planning on getting the Richard II in that series.

February 25, 2014
5:47 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I don’t have Baldwin on Mary, Olga. Did I miss one? Personally I thought all of the ones I listed were very good. Had a little trouble with Loades. Thought it dry. That was my third book though and I was probably filled up with info on Mary.
I can’t say that I like any that I have read so far about Richard. I just finished Wilkinson’s book on the Princes. Who did kill those kids, darn it?
General history book don’t get down to the nitty gritty, but I have Jones’ book and have referenced it a few times.
I just started David Baldwin’s Richard III. Ashdown-Hill is next.
I’m going to be looking for Mortimer’s books.

February 25, 2014
7:10 pm
Avatar
Avarice
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 14
Member Since:
February 16, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks for all the additional recommendations! I don’t know where to start! One person I’d love to know more facts on is definitely Mary Tudor. Based on the fiction I’ve seen and read she is one of my favourite Tudors, however it seems generally considered that she was a bad woman for the things she did once she was crowned. Learning more truth on her would be fantastic, so I think I’ll start with some non-fiction on her first! Thanks for the Mary recommendations Sharon!

Boleyn: I didn’t know that of Bess and her granddaughter, that seems very sad indeed. Was Arabella murdered or did she die from natural causes within the tower?

Sharon: What was the book that you read on The Princes In The Tower? It seems a shame that the truth was never discovered there.
I know P.Gregory wrote in her Plantagenet books that Richard was swapped out for a serving boy of some sort, and thus lived, not having died in the tower, so it’d be interesting to get the facts on what actually happened there (as surely what she wrote was just one of many theories).

Olga: I definitely prefer books that look more into detail than those with an “overview”, also! Thanks for all the great recommendations!

February 25, 2014
7:15 pm
Avatar
Boleyn
Kent.
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2285
Member Since:
January 3, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

From what little I know Arabella died of an illness, but it has been suggested that she was poisoned.. Personally I think it was illness. Lets face conditions in the tower were exactly sanatary that might have helped to work her end.

Semper Fidelis, quod sum quod

February 25, 2014
8:24 pm
Avatar
Sharon
Binghamton, NY
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2115
Member Since:
February 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Avarice,
You are very welcome. I just posted on another page some of my thoughts on Mary. She was not a bad woman, and I hope what I posted doesn’t come off that way. I would never want to show any disrespect for her.
The book I was talking about was, The Prince In The Tower, by Josephine Wilkinson. It’s pretty good. There are some questions that I want to know the answer to before I die….Like who really killed JFK, and who killed those boys? Were the boys killed, or spirited away? HAH! Good luck, right?
I don’t read PG at all. She scares me. Wink
That is a ton of books. They will keep you busy. On Mary…My favorite was Linda Porter’s book, easy reading, but like I said they are all good.

February 26, 2014
4:31 am
Avatar
Olga
Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 766
Member Since:
October 28, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think Baldwin’s Richard III is the best introductory book to Richard. It is so neutral you can go into reading the other books (which are generally nor neutral!) with less preconceived ideas and more facts under your belt. I always recommend that one to people looking for a R3 book. Ross’ book is excellent but much older, still for a political overview it is valuable.
I forgot S.B Chrimes (Yale series) for Henry VII. I have yet to read Penn’s, Terry Breverton went off about it to me and I now have a bad feeling about it Laugh

Somebody get a TARDIS. Maybe we can still whisk the boys away.

No permission to create posts
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 70

Currently Online:
11 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Anyanka: 2345

Boleyn: 2285

Sharon: 2115

Bella44: 934

DuchessofBrittany: 847

Mya Elise: 782

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 0

Members: 426044

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 13

Topics: 1679

Posts: 23600

Newest Members:

darryluw16, jeannettefs16, HapunrU, levisthomas02, anntb60, normawe2

Administrators: Claire: 998